A Pale high quality View of outlet sale Hills outlet sale

A Pale high quality View of outlet sale Hills outlet sale

A Pale high quality View of outlet sale Hills outlet sale
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From the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature and author of the Booker Prize–winning novel The Remains of the Day

Here is the story of Etsuko, a Japanese woman now living alone in England, dwelling on the recent suicide of her daughter. In a novel where past and present confuse, she relives scenes of Japan''s devastation in the wake of World War II.

From the Inside Flap

The story of Etsuko, a Japanese woman now living alone in England, dwelling on the recent suicide of her daughter. In a story where past and present confuse, she relives scenes of Japan''s devastation in the wake of World War II.

From the Back Cover

The story of Etsuko, a Japanese woman now living alone in England, dwelling on the recent suicide of her daughter. In a story where past and present confuse, she relives scenes of Japan''s devastation in the wake of World War II.

About the Author

Kazuo Ishiguro is the 2017 winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature. His work has been translated into more than 40 languages. Both  The Remains of the Day and  Never Let Me Go have sold more than 1 million copies, and both were adapted into highly acclaimed films. Ishiguro''s other work includes  The Buried Giant,  Nocturnes, A Pale View of the Hills, and  An Artist of the Floating World.

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Customer reviews

4.3 out of 54.3 out of 5
660 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

S. A.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This is a great book. It''s very hard to review books on ...
Reviewed in the United States on March 17, 2018
This is a great book. It''s very hard to review books on amazon or in general as different people have different tastes and styles of reading. I think it is a thoughtfully written book and the diction is so poetic. At the same time, it is so unsettling that I checked under... See more
This is a great book. It''s very hard to review books on amazon or in general as different people have different tastes and styles of reading. I think it is a thoughtfully written book and the diction is so poetic. At the same time, it is so unsettling that I checked under my bed a couple of times and locked my room door while reading. It is a rare thing for me to have a book that makes me feel unsettled/creeped out while there is nothing overtly wrong happening. I am a fan.
18 people found this helpful
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Pavic
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent
Reviewed in the United States on December 11, 2016
I love Kazuo Ishiguro and this book is the best one to start reading his work. Although many people complain that there is no real plot and parts of the action are left to the reader''s imagination, this book has an amazing structure and the things that are left unsaid are... See more
I love Kazuo Ishiguro and this book is the best one to start reading his work. Although many people complain that there is no real plot and parts of the action are left to the reader''s imagination, this book has an amazing structure and the things that are left unsaid are part of the characters'' implied trauma. The technique makes the novel more subtle and more interesting. An excellent book!
18 people found this helpful
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Masao Ishihama
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
My mother was born and brought up in Nagasaki. ...
Reviewed in the United States on February 13, 2018
My mother was born and brought up in Nagasaki. My aunt and cousins suffered the atomic bomb on the 9th of August, 1945. Scenery of Nagasaki described in this novel seems to be different from those told by my mother and relatives. However, Mr. Ishiguro seems to succeed in... See more
My mother was born and brought up in Nagasaki. My aunt and cousins suffered the atomic bomb on the 9th of August, 1945. Scenery of Nagasaki described in this novel seems to be different from those told by my mother and relatives. However, Mr. Ishiguro seems to succeed in expressing the social confusion in Japan just after the World War II and Japanese people''s mind. In that sense, the title of this story might be recognized as "A Pale View of My Acquaintances in Nagasaki".
9 people found this helpful
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SEOUROCK
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Feels like watching a very well drawn, geat painting
Reviewed in the United States on November 22, 2015
To me, this is the second book of Kazuo Ishiguro''s, after I had read the first, "The remains of the Day". Or, this book could be the third, since I had watched his "Never Let Me Go" in a movie. Anyway, compared to the first, " A pale View of Hills"... See more
To me, this is the second book of Kazuo Ishiguro''s, after I had read the first, "The remains of the Day". Or, this book could be the third, since I had watched his "Never Let Me Go" in a movie. Anyway, compared to the first, " A pale View of Hills" seems to be a little below than what I had expected. But this book is still good and enjoyable enough to read. The atmosphere and senses in this book feel as much like those in the first. Characters and landscapes are described both from a distance and in great detail. Kazuo Ishiguro is the true literary master, who draws a great picture in letters, instead of in paints. His novels have a strange mystery, which are not forgettable in readers minds even a very long time after the reading. Kazuo''s readers can easily sense that other many common novels are far below than Kazuo''s.
11 people found this helpful
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Graeme Hunter
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
''The Remains of the Day'' is pretty much my favourite novel ever
Reviewed in the United States on April 21, 2016
''The Remains of the Day'' is pretty much my favourite novel ever, but Ishiguro''s other books haven''t reached that exalted standard. His shtick is to drop the reader without explanation into an exotic locale where there''s something going on beneath the surface. You keep... See more
''The Remains of the Day'' is pretty much my favourite novel ever, but Ishiguro''s other books haven''t reached that exalted standard. His shtick is to drop the reader without explanation into an exotic locale where there''s something going on beneath the surface. You keep reading to find out what is going on (also because of the unfamiliar locale and Ishiguro''s perfect minimalist style). Sometimes the reveal is startling (''The Remains of the Day'', ''An Artist of the Floating World''), sometimes it''s lunch-bag let-down (''Never Let Me Go'', ''The Buried Giant'' and, yes, ''A Pale View of Hills''). I''ll keep reading Kazuo Ishiguro. One day he''ll come up with the perfect plot again, and until then he will out-write just about anyone.
10 people found this helpful
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parhelion
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Absorbing and disturbing.
Reviewed in the United States on August 22, 2015
A building sense of foreboding pushed me to read the book straight through and the deftly realized finish, though foreshadowed, and without the need for anything supernatural or even evil, was chilling. It deserves rereading and I advise allowing the book plenty of time to... See more
A building sense of foreboding pushed me to read the book straight through and the deftly realized finish, though foreshadowed, and without the need for anything supernatural or even evil, was chilling. It deserves rereading and I advise allowing the book plenty of time to seep in. It has a significance that affects everyone at some point.
17 people found this helpful
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Oldie But Goodie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Intriguing, Mystifying, Totally Absorbing
Reviewed in the United States on March 5, 2010
If you, like me, delight in reading books that go beyond just stimulating the visceral senses, Kazuo Ishiguro is an author whose books you want to add to your library - for repeated readings, I dare say. Ishiguro''s tale-telling in the first person narrative is... See more
If you, like me, delight in reading books that go beyond just stimulating the visceral senses, Kazuo Ishiguro is an author whose books you want to add to your library - for repeated readings, I dare say.

Ishiguro''s tale-telling in the first person narrative is spell-binding. The title can have multiple meanings, depending on which aspect of the book you are focusing on. I know I will definitely need to reread this novel again to put all the pieces together.

Is Sachiko Etsuko''s projection of herself? Is Mariko representative of Keiko? To hear Etsuko switch to the first person when talking to Mariko near the river at the end of the novel really packed a punch. Had I considered such at other points in the book? Yes. But, to have it simply pop out there at the last minute was like cold water being splashed on my face.

The reference to Etsuko hanging onto something that caught on her foot while crossing the river was obviously a metaphor to her hanging onto the past. Mariko running away, right after asking why Etsuko was hanging onto that, was that Keiko fading in her memory or Etsuko questioning herself?

Our memories certainly do fade with time and can become quite unreliable, particularly if we are reviewing decisions and behaviors we would rather not recall. Given Keiko''s suicide most likely being connected with Etsuko''s decision to move to the United States certainly is reason for her to want to rewrite history to alleviate guilt.

I saw the cover from an earlier release of this book and it shows a Japanese woman - just her head - wearing a mask. This reinforces the ending of this book ... that Sachiko is really a mask Etsuko wears in her mind as she recalls the irrevocable decisions, and their consequences, of her past.

I finished reading A Pale View Of Hills three weeks ago and am still mulling it over in my mind. I plan to reread it again, looking for the subtle clues Ishiguro has surely placed throughout the book, but until then I will simply enjoy the experience of mulling over this literary work of art.
20 people found this helpful
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John Vidale
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Ambiguous, and not for the faint of heart
Reviewed in the United States on December 7, 2006
Having read 4 or 5 other Ishiguro books, and with the goal of reading all his novels, I just finished reading this one last night. This story of a woman, her life, her families, and her homes is disturbing and mysterious on many levels. Unlike his later books,... See more
Having read 4 or 5 other Ishiguro books, and with the goal of reading all his novels, I just finished reading this one last night.

This story of a woman, her life, her families, and her homes is disturbing and mysterious on many levels. Unlike his later books, Ishiguro does not cleanly unveil a single story here. Rather he raises the themes of the disintegration of social fabric after the Nagasaki bombing, the transformation of Japanese culture to a more western attitude, mother-daughter relations, and social climbing through a series of incidents that combine the actual story with distortions and failures in memory of the narrator Etsuko/Sachiko.

The power of the book is in the stark unfairness of Etsuko''s actions, their inevitability, and that they probably happened a hundredfold in Japan in the 40s and 50s.

Personally, I found the obscureness of the underlying plot a bit thick. Even reviewing 5 or 6 commentaries on the book online this morning, I didn''t get to the bottom of it, and can see some and perhaps all of the commentators I found are even more confused. Probably Ishiguro knew he was leaving ambiguity and loose ends, in fact in one interview he said as much. For example, I suspect a sinister interpretation of the "rope" Mariko referred to 2 or 3 times, but found little clarity online. But the power of the book is clear, this is my favorite of Ishiguro''s books.
9 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Worldtrekker
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A very odd and rather unfulfilling book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 21, 2020
I found this a very strange book, perhaps because I am not familiar with Japanese tradition and social mores. As far as I could make out, and not having read other people''s reviews/interpretations, it deals with the cultural changes before and after The Bomb in Nagasaki,...See more
I found this a very strange book, perhaps because I am not familiar with Japanese tradition and social mores. As far as I could make out, and not having read other people''s reviews/interpretations, it deals with the cultural changes before and after The Bomb in Nagasaki, but it was addressed in such a tangential way, the message was rather obscure, and there were so many unanswered questions, so many issues just hinted at and left hanging in the air, that ultimately I was no better informed by the end of the book than before I started. I kept hoping it would develope into something, that I would learn more about the tragedies that befell each individual in the narrative, but I was left feeling somewhere between flat and bewildered by the end.
4 people found this helpful
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Patricia Davison
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Poignant story...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 5, 2017
Another great read from this author. The plot has been outlined by other readers so suffice to say this book offers an interesting set of characters - none of whom I warmed to but all complex. I found the story line bleak and full of lonely people who seemed to drift...See more
Another great read from this author. The plot has been outlined by other readers so suffice to say this book offers an interesting set of characters - none of whom I warmed to but all complex. I found the story line bleak and full of lonely people who seemed to drift through life in a solitary manner,burdened by their own lonely and insular lives and memories...this is what makes the book so fascinating really....that no,one else is really interested in the events in our lives which have moulder us into the people we have become. Highly recommended read.
12 people found this helpful
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Laura
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
All endings are the truth
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 28, 2021
After reading Never Let Me Go and The Buried Giant, I decided to read his first book published. I found that A Pale View of Hills was an easier read and managed to read most of it in a day. The characters are interesting and as many of his books, mystery of details are...See more
After reading Never Let Me Go and The Buried Giant, I decided to read his first book published. I found that A Pale View of Hills was an easier read and managed to read most of it in a day. The characters are interesting and as many of his books, mystery of details are still left for his readers to assume by the end. A much more optimistic end to this book compared to the others which had gloomy endings, much to my relief! What I appreciated about this book most was the history and changing traditions/views that generations held in Japan suddenly post war. It really intrigued me and was relatable to anywhere you live - the changing generations that you start to pick up on at different stages of your life. The mystery of what really happened with her daughter, or her friend and her daughter, will no doubt continue to bug me for a few days after reading this. However I''m starting to feel that this is the genius of Kazuo - his ability to make you explore so many meanings and endings leave you with so much more than answers because, at the end of the day, all the answers could be and are the truth. The role of the writer to inflict a story on you does not require them to inflict an ending or meaning to you. The reader is taught to fish for themselves.
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Michael Riley
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Elegant and sad
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 1, 2021
This is a sad but moving story of estrangement and separation. The background is change in Japanese society after the bombing of Nagasaki. Old Japanese values are challenged by a new generation. The relationships between men and women, young and old and mothers and...See more
This is a sad but moving story of estrangement and separation. The background is change in Japanese society after the bombing of Nagasaki. Old Japanese values are challenged by a new generation. The relationships between men and women, young and old and mothers and daughters are transformed. Told through the eyes of a Japanese widow living in Ehgland. Beautifully written.
3 people found this helpful
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N.MOORCROFT
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A masterpiece
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 28, 2018
Another piece of intensely evocative writing by this amazing author.It is set in Nagasaki and in Britain at different periods in the life of a Japanese woman.Not easy reading by any means and yet it was unputdownable.A sense of uncomfortable disquiet runs through the book...See more
Another piece of intensely evocative writing by this amazing author.It is set in Nagasaki and in Britain at different periods in the life of a Japanese woman.Not easy reading by any means and yet it was unputdownable.A sense of uncomfortable disquiet runs through the book although it is serene on the surface.The author very skillfully gives voice to the parts of all of us that we try to sweep away.For me reading the book was like looking at a book of fine paintings,each one a masterpiece in its observation of the present and meticulous attention to fine detail,whilst always retaining an unseen mysterious element.Read it!
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