Amal discount popular Unbound online

Amal discount popular Unbound online

Amal discount popular Unbound online

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"Saeed''s timely and stirring middle-grade debut is a celebration of resistance and justice."--Kirkus Reviews, starred review

The compelling story of a girl''s fight to regain her life and dreams after being forced into indentured servitude.


Life is quiet and ordinary in Amal''s Pakistani village, but she had no complaints, and besides, she''s busy pursuing her dream of becoming a teacher one day. Her dreams are temporarily dashed when--as the eldest daughter--she must stay home from school to take care of her siblings. Amal is upset, but she doesn''t lose hope and finds ways to continue learning. Then the unimaginable happens--after an accidental run-in with the son of her village''s corrupt landlord, Amal must work as his family''s servant to pay off her own family''s debt.

Life at the opulent Khan estate is full of heartbreak and struggle for Amal--especially when she inadvertently makes an enemy of a girl named Nabila. Most troubling, though, is Amal''s growing awareness of the Khans'' nefarious dealings. When it becomes clear just how far they will go to protect their interests, Amal realizes she will have to find a way to work with others if they are ever to exact change in a cruel status quo, and if Amal is ever to achieve her dreams.

Review

* “Saeed ( Written in the Stars) infuses this true-to-life story of unjust power dynamics in a poor Pakistani village with a palpable sense of dread regarding the fate of the inquisitive, industrious, poetry-loving titular character. . . . Amal’s experience navigating an unfamiliar social hierarchy in the landlord’s lavish estate exposes her to pervasive gender inequities and unfair labor practices. . . . Saeed’s eloquent, suspenseful, eye-opening tale offers a window into the contemporary practice of indentured servitude and makes a compelling case for the power of girls’ education to transform systemic injustice.” Publishers Weekly, starred review

* “A Pakistani girl’s dreams of an education dissolve when she is forced into indentured servitude. . . . Amal narrates, her passion for learning, love for her family, and despair at her circumstance evoked with sympathy and clarity, as is the setting. Inspired by Malala Yousafzai and countless unknown girls like her, Saeed’s timely and stirring middle-grade debut is a celebration of resistance and justice.”— Kirkus Reviews, starred review

* “Saeed’s middle grade debut shares an empowering message about the importance of family, literacy, and cultural ties. The rich storytelling, nuanced characterization of an all-Pakistani cast, complex and layered look at the socioeconomics of the region, and richly described setting make this ultimately hopeful contemporary tale a good alternative to Gloria Whelan’s Homeless Bird and Patricia McCormick’s Sold. A strong choice for all middle grade shelves, especially where readers are seeking stories about young girls in non-Western countries overcoming adversity.”— School Library Journal, starred review

* "This beautifully crafted and moving story will encourage middle grade readers to ponder such issues as indentured servitude, class, and resistance. Saeed’s well-developed narrative will evoke empathy for all those around the world like Amal, who are not guaranteed freedom or education. An inspired read for all, particularly for those who have followed Malala Yousafzai’s story or enjoyed Deborah Ellis’ The Breadwinner or Tara Sullivan’s The Bitter Side of Sweet."— School Library Connection, starred review

“Readers will find that a little perseverance and a heart filled with hope can eventually surmount a harsh reality. Saeed fills her prose with lush descriptions of Pakistani life, while still managing to connect with readers whose surroundings and experiences will be starkly different. Hand to any reader who struggles with definitive gender roles, norms, and expectations held in place by societal structures.”— Booklist

“This simple yet lyrical novel paints an evocative picture of life in a small village in modern-day Pakistan, especially the limits placed on girls and women. . . . It may serve as a read-alike or a gateway to stories such as Yousafzai’s autobiography, I Am Malala; The Lines We Cross by Randa Abdel-Fattah; and Saeed’s debut novel, Written in the Stars.”— The Voice of Youth Advocates

“Amal’s narration is straightforward and direct, and her despair at losing her dreams is palpable, as is her unflagging determination to get them back. . . . There’s clear commentary on the marginalized lives of girls and women in Pakistan . . . and the fight for her education is already fraught even before she is taken from her home. An author’s note discusses the issues of indentured servitude, particularly among girls.”— The Bulletin of the Center for Children''s Books

“This heart-wrenching yet hopeful contemporary novel about class, gender, and literacy features a narrator who takes great risks in the name of justice and self-determination. . . . Short chapters and unadorned prose make the story accessible and direct, with Amal’s emotions, perspective, and strength anchoring the narrative. An author’s note asserts that Amal represents real women and girls who fight injustice across the globe, often without recognition.”— Horn Book

About the Author

Aisha Saeed also wrote Written in the Stars, and is a Pakistani-American writer, teacher, and attorney. She has been featured on MTV, the Huffington Post, NBC and the BBC, and her writings have appeared in publications including the journal ALAN and the Orlando Sentinel. As one of the founding members of the much talked about We Need Diverse Books Campaign, she is helping change the conversation about diverse books. Aisha lives in Atlanta, Georgia, with her husband and sons.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1

I watched from the window as the boys tumbled out of the brick schoolhouse across the field from us. Our class was running over. Again.
      Girls shifted in their seats and snuck glances at the clock above the chalkboard. My friend Hafsa sighed.
     “And finally, I have some bad news,” Miss Sadia told us. She picked up a stack of papers from her desk. “I finished grading your math tests. Only five of you passed.”
     The class let out a collective groan.
     “Now, now,” she hushed us. “This just means we have more work to do. We’ll go over it tomorrow and take another test next week.”
     “Those questions were hard,” my younger sister Seema whispered to me. We lined up by the chalkboard at the front of the class to get our tests. “I should’ve stayed with the younger class until fall.”
     “Oh, come on. You know you probably passed,” I whispered back. “When have you ever failed an exam?”
     Seema tugged at her sleeves as she walked up to Miss Sadia. It was only in the arms that you could see my old uniform was too big on her. Miss Sadia handed Seema the paper. As expected, Seema’s worried expression shifted to a smile. Her steps were lighter before she slipped out of the classroom.
     “I’m sorry I can’t help today,” I told Miss Sadia once the room was empty. This was my favorite part of the day, when everyone left and it was just the two of us. The building felt like it had exhaled, expanding a little bit without all thirty-four of us, crammed two to a desk, filling up nearly every square inch of space. “My mother is in bed again.”
     “Is the baby almost here?”
     “Yes, so my father said I have to come home and watch my sisters.”
     “I’ll miss your help, Amal, but he’s right; family comes first.”
     I knew helping family was what a good eldest daughter did, but this time after school with Miss Sadia wasn’t just fun; it was important. I wanted to be a teacher when I grew up, and who better to learn from than the best teacher I ever had? I loved washing the chalkboards, sweeping the floor and hearing stories of her college days. I loved watching her go over her lessons and rework them based on what worked and what didn’t the day before. I learned so much from watching her. How could my father not understand?
     “I could still use your help with the poetry unit next week,” she told me. “Some of the students are grumbling about it. Think you could convince Hafsa to give it a chance? You know how she rallies the others to her side. She’ll listen to you.”
     “I don’t think she minds reading the poems. Writing them makes her nervous.”
     “You’d think everyone would be happy to write poetry! Shorter than an essay.”
     “It’s different. The great poets like Ghalib, Rumi, Iqbal—they had things to say.”
     “And don’t you have things to say?”
     “What would I write about?” I laughed. “My little sisters? My father’s sugarcane fields and orange groves? I love reading poems, but there’s nothing for me to really write about. Our life is boring.”
     “That’s not true! Write about what you see! Write about your dreams. Pakistan was founded by the dreams of poets. Aren’t we of the same earth?”
     Miss Sadia’s dramatic way of talking was one of the reasons I loved her, but I wasn’t convinced. It’s not that I wasn’t proud of my family and our life. I was lucky to belong to one of the more prosperous families in our Punjabi village but it didn’t change the fact that I lived in a village so tiny, it didn’t even register as a dot on a map.
     But I promised I’d talk to Hafsa.
     This is what I now remember most about my last afternoon at school—the smell of the dusty chalkboard, the sound of the students lingering outside the door, and mostly, how easily I took my ordinary life for granted.

 
Chapter 2

I raced down the school’s gravel walkway to catch up to Seema and Hafsa. The sun blazed overhead, warming my chador and my hair beneath it.
     “I’m buying Miss Sadia one of those bells I see on TV. You know, the kind that rings when class is over?” Hafsa grumbled.
     “She doesn’t always keep us late,” I protested.
     “Remember last week?” Hafsa said. “How she went on and on about constellations? By the time I got home, my brothers were out of their school clothes and halfway through their homework.”
     “But wasn’t it interesting?” I asked. “The way the night stars help us when we’re lost and tell all sorts of different stories?”
     “Why do I need to know about connecting dots in the sky? I want to be the first doctor in my family. Not the first astronaut,” Hafsa said.
     Hafsa and I had been friends so long, I couldn’t remember a time I didn’t know her, but when she talked like this, I didn’t understand her at all. Unlike Hafsa, I wanted to know everything there was to know. How fast did airplanes fly? Why did some leave whiffs of clouds in their wake and others didn’t? Where did ladybugs go when the rain came hard and fast? What was it like to walk through the streets of Paris, or New York, or Karachi? There was so much I didn’t know that even if I spent my whole life trying, I knew I could only learn a small percentage of it.
     “How’s your mom?” Hafsa asked. “My mother said her back is hurting.”
     “It’s gotten worse,” I told her. “She couldn’t get out of bed yesterday.”
     “My mother said that’s a good sign. Backaches mean a boy,” Hafsa said. “I know that would make your parents happy.”
     “It would be fun to have a brother,” I said.
     “There it is! Look at the door!” Hafsa said when we turned the bend toward our homes. She pointed to the building that had appeared next to our village mosque. A structure had never emerged quite like this before with no explanation. Two weeks ago, a concrete foundation had been poured onto the field where we played soccer. The next week, brick walls arose and windows appeared, and today there was a door—painted lime green!
     “Any idea yet what it could be?” I asked her.
     “Yes.” Hafsa grinned. If Hafsa could have it her way, she’d be permanently stationed by the crates of fruit at her family’s market, soaking up every bit of gossip. “Khan Sahib is building a factory.”
     I rolled my eyes. Rumors and gossip were a part of life in our village. Some of the talk was ordinary, about the state of the crops or the weather, but often it centered on Khan Sahib, our village’s powerful landlord.
     “Why would he build a factory here? He has plenty in Islamabad and Lahore,” Seema said.       What we need is a clinic. Look how much Amma’s back hurts. The doctor in town is good, but this village needs a proper clinic.”
     “Do you really think Khan Sahib would put up anything to help us?” Hafsa scoffed.
     “Maybe it’s not him building it,” I suggested.
     “Look at the fancy green door! Who else has time and money to waste like that? You know I’m right.”
     Any unexplainable situation was always pinned to Khan Sahib. He was the mysterious figure I’d heard of all my life but never seen. When I was younger, he loomed large and scary, like a character in a horror story.
     “Sure! He’s the one who breathes fire when he talks, right?” I rolled my eyes.
     “Didn’t he pick all the fruit off Naima’s guava tree?” Seema winked.
     “I heard he’s why we’ve had no rain for months,” I continued.
     “I don’t decide what I hear,” Hafsa huffed. “I just report it.”
     “We’ll find out what it is soon enough.” I hooked my arm through Seema’s. “But in the meantime, let’s hope it’s a clinic.”
     Hafsa’s house came first on our path, just past the post office. Then came mine. I saw it in the distance. Gray like the others surrounding it except for the roses my mother planted around its border just before I was born; they still bloomed each spring around this time, without fail. It’s why spring was my favorite time of year.
     My friend Omar peddled past us in his blue and khaki school uniform. He chimed his bell three times, our signal to meet. The stream. That’s the direction he was headed in.
     “Oh no.” I looked in my book bag. “I left my exam in class.”
     “Again?” Hafsa frowned.
     “Tell Amma I won’t be long?” I asked Seema.
     Seema hesitated. Our father would be home soon, but she knew Omar didn’t chime his bicycle bell three times unless it was important.
     “Okay.” Seema nodded. “Hurry.”

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
847 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

Kumari S.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An important and engaging story
Reviewed in the United States on May 9, 2018
Amal Unbound is a gripping novel about bravery, the power of education, and the need to think beyond the status quo. I loved rooting for Amal and getting a glimpse into Pakistan. Highly recommended. As a side note, I''d also recommend the author''s first book, a young adult... See more
Amal Unbound is a gripping novel about bravery, the power of education, and the need to think beyond the status quo. I loved rooting for Amal and getting a glimpse into Pakistan. Highly recommended. As a side note, I''d also recommend the author''s first book, a young adult novel titled ''Written in the Stars'' that I absolutely loved.
22 people found this helpful
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CoffeeMom
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Future classic
Reviewed in the United States on May 17, 2018
Excellent and important story with a Pakistani female heroine. This book is written for children and is without bad language, sex, drugs, extreme violence (see note way below-- it is a spoiler). Absolutely suitable for older elementary. This one belongs on... See more
Excellent and important story with a Pakistani female heroine.

This book is written for children and is without bad language, sex, drugs, extreme violence (see note way below-- it is a spoiler). Absolutely suitable for older elementary. This one belongs on everyone''s shelf.
31 people found this helpful
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M.C-S.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Must Read for Upper Elementary
Reviewed in the United States on August 18, 2019
As a 3rd grade teacher, who focuses on diverse literature and jumps on any chance to bring the global world into my classroom, I had Amal Unbound sitting on my shelf for a while. I didn’t read it as soon as it was released because it had been marketed as 10 years and up, so... See more
As a 3rd grade teacher, who focuses on diverse literature and jumps on any chance to bring the global world into my classroom, I had Amal Unbound sitting on my shelf for a while. I didn’t read it as soon as it was released because it had been marketed as 10 years and up, so more along 4th/5th grade interest level. I am so mad at myself for not reading it sooner! Needless to say, I read it in one sitting and was cheering for Amal. Her courage and bravery are impressive and the writing is so authentic, I never once questioned any expressions or descriptions used. Amal navigates an environment that is anything but easy and she shows that characters have many different facets in real life, even when they are cruel at their core.

“I’m not brave. I’m terrified. I just don’t have a choice.”
“You always have a choice. Making choices even when they scare you because you know it’s the right thing to do—that’s bravery.”

This is one of those books that stay with you for a while. Enough has been said by previous reviewers about the book lending itself to discussions about courage, determination, the power of education, modern day slavery, gender, economics (debts, loans, etc.), etc.

The book is written with a younger audience in mind as well.
8 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Must Read
Reviewed in the United States on May 10, 2018
Even though this is in the young adult category, it’s worthy of reading by all ages. Life isn’t fair, but a few brave souls still stand up for what is right.
8 people found this helpful
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C. L.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A powerful, moving read
Reviewed in the United States on August 2, 2018
I finished reading AMAL UNBOUND today, and oh my goodness. It was just as powerful and moving as everyone says. I loved the inherent message that we ALL have the power to make change, no matter how helpless we may feel or how confining our circumstances may seem. Aisha... See more
I finished reading AMAL UNBOUND today, and oh my goodness. It was just as powerful and moving as everyone says. I loved the inherent message that we ALL have the power to make change, no matter how helpless we may feel or how confining our circumstances may seem. Aisha Saeed mentions in the afterword that Amal''s story was partially inspired by Malala, and I can absolutely see that influence in Amal''s unwavering courage and conviction. A beautiful story, and one I definitely see rereading—and reading with my daughter—in the future!
6 people found this helpful
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snapbookreviews
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Stunning Cover, Compelling Story
Reviewed in the United States on October 28, 2018
When I hear the words "indentured servant" I think of a youth or immigrant in colonial America, working seven years to learn a trade and work their way to freedom. In Amal Unbound, author Aisha Saeed shines a light on the hidden, present day, virtual enslavement of... See more
When I hear the words "indentured servant" I think of a youth or immigrant in colonial America, working seven years to learn a trade and work their way to freedom. In Amal Unbound, author Aisha Saeed shines a light on the hidden, present day, virtual enslavement of oppressed people, especially girls.
Twelve -year-old Amal is the eldest child living in a present day Pakistani village. One day she is attending school, dreaming of becoming a teacher and the next she must stay home to take care of her family while her mother recovers from childbirth.
Frustrated by having to care for her two younger sisters, Amal goes to the market alone, enjoying her temporary reprieve from constant care taking.
She is nearly run over by the corrupt and ruthless overlord who rules the village with impossible financial demands. Amal could be killed, beaten, or forced to live and work in the overlord''s household. Even as the car arrives to take her away, Amal and her family hold out hope that they will be able to raise the money to buy her freedom.
Amal soon learns that she has little chance of leaving the situation and despair nearly overtakes her. She must learn to negotiate the complex social system of the house staff and barely escapes the overlord''s wrath after being set up by another servant. Worse, the Kahn family kills those who stand in their way.
Amal rises above her despair and risks all in a desperate plan to bring justice to her village and to win her freedom.
The story of Amal Unbound is as stunning and compelling as the book''s cover. According to Saeed, most indentured servitude does not end with freedom and this odious practice is a world-wide problem, but readers will cheer Amal''s determination and fortitude.
Perfect for a read aloud, book club, or gift for middle grade students and teachers.
6 people found this helpful
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Dana Al-Basha
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Important book
Reviewed in the United States on February 11, 2020
The book cover is a piece of art, and this book is written for a younger audience, like kids between 9 and 13. I think Aisha Saeed''s books should be put into every school curriculum. In Pakistan, Amal holds on to her dream of being a teacher even after becoming... See more
The book cover is a piece of art, and this book is written for a younger audience, like kids between 9 and 13. I think Aisha Saeed''s books should be put into every school curriculum.

In Pakistan, Amal holds on to her dream of being a teacher even after becoming an indentured servant to pay off her family''s debt to the wealthy and corrupt Khan family.

The book as the previous one Aisha Saeed wrote burned me. I felt angry and I wanted to enter the book and save Amal from the tyrant monster who made her a slave (I felt that Khan dude to be much older but he was in his early twenties). Amal''s name in Arabic means Hope الأمل... and I think it''s such a suitable name, she hopes for a better future for herself and others and hopes to change the injustice in her village.

On the other hand, I believe that some things are disguised as bad things that might be good things in the long run. In the beginning of the book, Amal was treated like an unpaid maid to her family, they depended on her too much while she is a child as well and her father didn''t care about her education. She only imagined herself as the woman she respected the most, her teacher in school. That''s what she wanted to be.

When she moved to the Khan estate she saw a different side to the same story, she might have come by force, but many others loved staying and working in that house. She had the opportunity to be exposed to both a different lifestyle and education both with different people and books. The books she read wouldn''t have been available to her in her house or school. Amal might have felt she lost something by what happened to her, but maybe she gained more than anyone else in her small town. She saw for herself how rich people lived, she learned different things, like how to be strong on her own, and most importantly that people even the ones you loved more than anything could move on and forget you. That she is stronger and braver than her parents. Her father was obviously planning on stopping her education, so maybe what happened benefited her in the long run, her father felt ashamed and indebted to her, she gained her freedom in her imprisonment.

The book ends in an open way, I think Amal could be anything she wants, not just a teacher, I think she is the one who is going to succeed between ALL of her friends and neighbors, she might even travel and see the world someday. This girl is a fighter!
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Jordan Matthews
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Engaging, informative - rec for gr 3-6
Reviewed in the United States on January 1, 2021
This is a quick-paced, engaging narrative to introduce young readers to contemporary life in Pakistan, with discussion of misogyny, social class and servitude. There''s a good intro to debt bondage; this can be left as written for younger readers and investigated in greater... See more
This is a quick-paced, engaging narrative to introduce young readers to contemporary life in Pakistan, with discussion of misogyny, social class and servitude. There''s a good intro to debt bondage; this can be left as written for younger readers and investigated in greater depth with those who are more mature. In the end, all is well.

Amal’s circumstances are likely much more fortunate than most who are actually in her position. Only one brief assault (hard face slap) occurs. A murder has occurred and figures in the plot though no details are given. Child marriage/exploitation is not discussed.
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Top reviews from other countries

Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good !!!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 7, 2019
Good!!
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nuvneet
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A beautiful read.
Reviewed in India on May 16, 2019
Book Review- Amal Unbound by Aisha Saeed Wow! an excellent read for the youngsters, a beautiful story of resilience and perseverance dealing with a wide variety of difficult issues like gender bias, education for girls, servitude, feudal system, debt trap, etc being faced...See more
Book Review- Amal Unbound by Aisha Saeed Wow! an excellent read for the youngsters, a beautiful story of resilience and perseverance dealing with a wide variety of difficult issues like gender bias, education for girls, servitude, feudal system, debt trap, etc being faced by many countries in the world. It is a great story which makes us aware that these evil practices still prevail in the society and equal access to education and opportunities is the only solution. This book helps in understanding the importance of what we take for granted and others wish for, they have to fight for equality of opportunity and choices in life.
2 people found this helpful
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jen6470
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Must read for kids and adults
Reviewed in Canada on December 15, 2018
I can’t rave enough about this book! Read it to my Grade 5 students this fall as apart of the GRA. They loved it! Excellent imagery and word choice that allow students to connect with a young Pakistani girl. There are numerous free and paid lesson plans available online and...See more
I can’t rave enough about this book! Read it to my Grade 5 students this fall as apart of the GRA. They loved it! Excellent imagery and word choice that allow students to connect with a young Pakistani girl. There are numerous free and paid lesson plans available online and through the author’s website. I would love to read more books by her or even a sequel !
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Me
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good, informative read
Reviewed in Canada on August 16, 2018
The book was well written and a good read. I’m planning to read it to my class for the global read aloud. It is interesting and will provoke rich conversations. As it is told from the perspective of a what a girl’s life is like in Pakistan it is lacking in male characters...See more
The book was well written and a good read. I’m planning to read it to my class for the global read aloud. It is interesting and will provoke rich conversations. As it is told from the perspective of a what a girl’s life is like in Pakistan it is lacking in male characters which may result in some boys not being interested.
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#booklover
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Speechless for words after reading this book
Reviewed in India on December 8, 2018
It is such a beautiful and moving book about the cruelty towards the children and lower class people. This book has an amazing emotional connection with all the readers and once you start reading it You cannot put the book down even for a second 😀
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