Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale
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Description

Product Description

TALES OF THE COCKTAIL SPIRITED AWARD® WINNER • IACP AWARD FINALIST • The New York Times bestselling author of My Paris Kitchen serves up more than 160 recipes for trendy cocktails, quintessential apéritifs, café favorites, complementary snacks, and more.

Bestselling cookbook author, memoirist, and popular blogger David Lebovitz delves into the drinking culture of France in Drinking French. This beautifully photographed collection features 160 recipes for everything from coffee, hot chocolate, and tea to Kir and regional apéritifs, classic and modern cocktails from the hottest Paris bars, and creative infusions using fresh fruit and French liqueurs. And because the French can''t imagine drinking without having something to eat alongside, David includes crispy, salty snacks to serve with your concoctions. Each recipe is accompanied by David''s witty and informative stories about the ins and outs of life in France, as well as photographs taken on location in Paris and beyond.

Whether you have a trip to France booked and want to know what and where to drink, or just want to infuse your next get-together with a little French flair, this rich and revealing guide will make you the toast of the town.

Review

“In the canon of drinking, there has been a conspicuous absence of information about how the French, undisputed masters of all things  gastronomique, imbibe at home and in that hallowed social space, the café. David Lebovitz is certainly the most qualified person I can think of to write this book, and he does so with deft precision. I knew this book was written with someone like me in mind—equal parts Francophile, food, and beverage enthusiast—when I opened to the very first recipe in the book, my beloved morning ritual: the café au lait.” —Jeffrey Morgenthaler, author of Drinking Distilled

“I can think of no one I''d rather meet for a drink than David Lebovitz. In his authoritative yet always approachable style, Lebovitz expertly guides us through the often-unspoken rituals, customs, and traditions of properly drinking French—whether it''s a morning café au lait, a mid-afternoon Picon bière, or a late-night Boulevardier. Lebovitz uses his years of experience as a baker and pastry chef to apply his keen understanding of ratios, formulas, and balancing flavor to seamlessly shift from the sweet life to the spirited life, with inventive recipes for café drinks, liqueurs, aperitifs, cocktails, and irresistible apéro snacks to accompany them.” —Brad Thomas Parsons, author of BittersAmaro, and  Last Call

“Anyone who has had the privilege of visiting Paris would certainly concur with David Lebovitz’s observation that ‘There is no shortage of rules in France; they even extend to beverages’. Thankfully, we Francophiles have this seasoned expat to conduct us through the idiosyncrasies of café culture. This handy recipe and resource guide doubles as  the modern French handbook for cocktail party hosts.” —Jim Meehan, author of Meehan’s Bartender Manual and The PDT Cocktail Book
 
“In France, drinking is more than a national sport . . . it’s an art! From our  petit noir (coffee) and teas to classic apéritifs and cocktails, no cup or glass is spared from the curious and amused gaze of David Lebovitz. As an acute connoisseur of French gastronomy, his tasty collection of recipes and social observations can be imbibed in one shot— Santé!” —Francois-Regis Gaudry, author of Let’s Eat France!
 

“Do you dream about moving to Paris and spending long, leisurely afternoons in cafés (hopefully with company as lively as David Lebovitz) sipping un café noisette and, later, an apéritif? Me too. This is the exact dreamy book we need to hold us over until that day arrives.” —Deb Perelman, author of Smitten Kitchen Every Day

About the Author

David Lebovitz has been a professional cook and baker for most of his life; he spent nearly thirteen years at Chez Panisse until he left the restaurant business in 1999 to write books. He moved to Paris in 2004 and turned his website into a phenomenally popular blog. He is the author of numerous cookbooks, including My Paris Kitchen, The Perfect Scoop, Ready for Dessert, and The Great Book of Chocolate, and two memoirs, The Sweet Life in Paris and L''Appart. He was named one of the top five pastry chefs in the Bay Area by the San Francisco Chronicle. David has also been featured in Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, Cook''s Illustrated, the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, Saveur, Travel + Leisure, Better Homes and Gardens, People, and more.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

On the darkened streets and sidewalks of France, the flicker of lights in corner cafés signals the start of the day. Whether you’re in a city like Paris, Lyon, or Marseille, or a village in the countryside, once the lights are on, the next order of business is to flip the switch on the coffee machine. With that simple action, the day begins.

While the machine is warming up, the beige ceiling lights cast a warm glow on wicker chairs stacked one on top of the other, along with the café tables, waiting to be set up on the sidewalk outside. Baguettes picked up at the local bakery on the way to work are propped up against the bar in a paper sack, and will eventually be sliced for breakfast tartines, served with butter and jam. But first things first: coffee.

Le barman (or woman) releases a sputtering blast of steam from the milk-warming wand, an indication that the machine is ready to go, as people start to wander in. In the wintertime, the warmth is definitely part of the attraction, as are the free morning newspapers on wooden spindles. But any time of the year, locals gather at their neighborhood bar to stand and drink a short, dark café express while reading the paper or catching up on commérages (gossip) in the neighborhood. Most of the customers have just woken up. Others are heading home after a long night of work—or play. But it doesn’t matter: There are no judgments in a French café; everyone is welcome to gather there, whether you spent the night sweeping the streets (or working the streets), are on your way to a business meeting, or are a timid tourist, hoping to get your first taste of France.

I fell into the latter category. On my first visit to Paris, zonked after the long flight from California, I walked into a nearby café and ordered a coffee at the counter. After the barman strong-armed the filter holder into place, he hit the switch and the espresso machine dribbled a trickle of murky dark liquid into a cup placed underneath the spout. When the flow of coffee stopped, he slid the cup and saucer toward me. I dutifully picked up my coffee, walked over to a table, and sat down to drink it. Within seconds the barman barked something at me that I didn’t understand (with my nonexistent comprehension of French, and French café customs), but eventually I deduced that I’d made a grave error by taking my coffee from the bar to a table, where the price of a cup doubles. I slunk back to the bar, embarrassed by my gaffe, finished my coffee, and left. That was my first lesson in how to drink, and behave, in a French café.

There seems to be a code of conduct for everything in France, from the salle d’attente of the doctor’s office, where you’re expected to greet each and every person in the waiting room when you walk in, to not calling a café waiter garçon (boy), which is a mild insult. One should say monsieur, because everyone is égal in France, and service here is about serving you, not being at your service. (You can thank the French Revolution for this mind-set, or blame it, if you’ve ever had a less-than-optimal customer service experience in the country.)

Later that afternoon, refreshed from a nap, I decided to go for a walk and take in the city. I had finally made it to Paris, the place I’d always dreamed of visiting, and didn’t want to spend my first day snoozing on the so-small-my-feet-were-hanging-over-the-edge bed in my hotel room. (Were French people really that tiny?) After meandering around for a while, stopping to admire the window of each and every chocolate and pastry shop I passed (there were so many of them—it was paradise!), I decided to try my luck again at a café. Being a sunny afternoon, I chose one where people were sitting at tables outside. And this time, I knew enough not to get my coffee at the bar first, and bring it to the table.

Still reluctant with my faltering French, I wove myself between the closely packed tables to squeeze into the only available seat I had spotted on the terrace. I did my best not to bump into or jostle anyone (after all I’d heard about Parisians before my visit, I was afraid to incur any wrath). I did, however, know how to say pardon. When I grazed someone and uttered a nervous “Uh, pardon,” no one looked at me or paid any attention. They kept on chatting with friends, reading their newspapers, or staring off into the distance, looking at nothing in particular with a cigarette smoldering in the ashtray.

Once seated, my anxiety climbed when I saw there was no menu or list of drinks on the table. Nothing I could point to and say, “I’ll have that.” I had no choice but to ask for my drink in French. Café was one French word that I found easy to master, but there’s only so much coffee you can drink in a day, and I was ready for something more relaxing. Fortunately, I spotted a blackboard on the wall that listed wines available either by the verre or by the pot, at prices that seemed too good to be true (three dollars for a glass of wine?!), and it seemed only right that I order one. I didn’t think I could drink a whole pot of wine by myself—and later learned that a pot is a refillable bottle with an extra-thick bottom so it doesn’t tip over—but I wouldn’t have a problem with une verre. Or was that un verre? My worries were mounting. I finalized the order in my mind, with a little help from my guidebook, and memorized the phrase in advance: “Je voudrais un verre du vin rouge, s’il vous plaît," so I’d be ready.

When the waiter finally came to take my order, I was suddenly on the spot and completely blanked on my plan of action. Flustered, I stammered and stuck with my usual “ . . . uh . . . um . . . un café," barely remembering to add a “monsieur” to the end of my less-carefully crafted phrase. A minute later he placed the little cup of coffee in front of me with two paper tubes of sugar resting on the saucer, as well as a separate burgundy-colored plastic dish with a built-in clip on it, holding l’addition (the check). I was no stranger to strong coffee, but after my first few cups in France, I understood why everyone added all that sugar. I ripped off the end of one of the sugar tubes and dumped it in. Then I added the second, and sat back to watch the world go by. 

I often refer to cafés as the living rooms of Paris. Historically, artists and writers used their local café as a place to work, attracted by the heat they didn’t have at home in the winter. They also benefited from the alcohol being served, which most writers deem a necessity after laboring over words all day. (Hence, entire chapters devoted to apéritifs, infusions, and cocktails in this book.) Cafés are also places to meet friends, especially in cities, since many people live in apartments that are too small to host guests, or they don’t want to go through the bother of tidying up. (With clothes dryers not very common in France, there are invariably a few unmentionables hanging in your apartment to dry, that you don’t necessarily want everyone else to see.) Also, who wants to stay at home when you can sit on an open-air terrace and have whatever kind of drink you want, served by a dashing Frenchman? Not me.

I’ve come to love the café culture in France, and the drinks and customs that are part of the rhythm of daily life. The wines, beers, coffees, infusions, apéritifs, liqueurs, distillations, cocktails, and digestives also tell the story of France. If you want to understand the French, watch how they eat, and see what they drink. After being in France for almost two decades, I’m no longer wary of cafés. And, like the French, I can be found in a café at all hours of the day, to meet friends, to write, or to conduct a little business (but nothing too serious). Once you’re seated at a table, it’s yours until you’re ready to leave. I used to wonder how people could sit in one place and do nothing for hours, as the French do. But after just a few years of living in France, I learned how to just be, too.

You can re-create the feeling and flavors of a French café at home, no matter where you live. I can’t prove this, but to me, French drinks taste better in traditional coffee cups and cocktail glasses. Over the years, I’ve amassed quite a collection of tableware and glasses by scouring flea markets and thrift stores. Most of my café au lait bowls and vintage glasses had stood up to decades of use before I got them, and I plan to use them for many more years to  come.

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4.9 out of 54.9 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Curious EpicureTop Contributor: Cooking
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The most delightful cocktail book I''ve ever read
Reviewed in the United States on March 28, 2020
Did I really need another cocktail book? No. And perhaps you don''t either, but if you like cocktails or even just the idea of cocktails, then this book is an absolute must-have, imo. I decided to go ahead and buy it for two reasons: - it was written by one... See more
Did I really need another cocktail book? No. And perhaps you don''t either, but if you like cocktails or even just the idea of cocktails, then this book is an absolute must-have, imo.

I decided to go ahead and buy it for two reasons:
- it was written by one of my favorite food writers, and
- it was so reasonably priced that I thought it was worth the gamble.
Good decision, because I ended up with one of the most delightful books I''ve ever purchased, not just on drink, but on any subject. The book is quite a lot heftier than I expected, the photos are wonderful, and the gold spine was not only an attractive surprise, but it makes finding this book on the shelf that much easier ;-)

The first thing I did was to try one of the food recipes. I had guests coming who really know and love food, so I chose to make:
-- Baked Camembert with Walnuts, Figs and Whiskey Gastrique. Oh my, oh my, oh my! I''ve used many baked brie recipes, but this one put all others to shame. My only regret was not having made two of them since they were so quickly devoured, with raves from everyone.
-- Cornichon Tapenade Deviled Eggs. If you love deviled eggs that have a bite of good pickle in them, this is the new one to try. I can''t wait to make this again.
The recipes in the food section are not numerous, but they are all such perfect accompaniments to drinks that I really don''t need more, especially when they are they likes of rillette, terrine, gougere, and more, none of which look too daunting to a home cook like me.

Then on to the cocktails. I never realized that many of my favorite cocktails were French in origin, although I might have guessed. Even my beloved Negroni! which Lebovitz does not hesitate to point out may actually be French in origin.

A good part of the charm of this book is all of the information that''s packed into it - the customs, traditions, and history in particular. The difficult part of this book is deciding which cocktail to make! The names alone are so much fun to read - Revised Obituary, My Tailor Is Rich, Scofflaw, Seat of Your Pants, etc - that it''s hard to pick one, even if you''ve managed to narrow things down by preferred spirit. Suffice it to say that if all of the cocktails are as delicious as the French 75 I made, and I expect they are, then I''m in trouble.

But there''s more.
I have long been wanting to do two things at home:
- make my own vermouth (if you have ever ventured into vermouth territory beyond the best-known brands, you know how amazing vermouth can be on its own, on ice with only a fat twist of orange peel), and
- make elderberry anything.
Lebovitz obliges with recipes for Vermouth Maison, Elderflower Wine, and an Elderflower Cordial. I will update after I tackle these.

Some ingredients are harder to find than others and there are a number of them that I know I will have to get online. But there are enough recipes to make with things that are easy enough to find to make this book more than worthwhile.
28 people found this helpful
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C. Henig
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The ONLY Drinks Book You Will Ever Need
Reviewed in the United States on March 14, 2020
I have been a fan of David Libowitz for years and a subscriber to his blog since the beginning. So I was disposed to like this book. But I was really delighted w/ Drinking French for one simple reason, I don''t need to go to the liquor store and stock up on esoteric bottles... See more
I have been a fan of David Libowitz for years and a subscriber to his blog since the beginning. So I was disposed to like this book. But I was really delighted w/ Drinking French for one simple reason, I don''t need to go to the liquor store and stock up on esoteric bottles of things I find I don''t like and will never use. Of course, there are the basics one must have. But the author has suggestions about alternatives for things that simply may not be available everywhere or sources for mail order. And there are things you can make at home to use in drinks. So there is a lot of flexibility. The range of offerings is so great that even the pickiest person should be able to find a new favourite. But the selection of drinks nibbles is simply wonderful. You will be able to offer a wonderful selection of things to accompany drinks. I am so glad I pre-ordered this book. It is the first drinks book I feel I will truly use. Don''t be put off by the French in the title. These drinks cross borders.
25 people found this helpful
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Shari M
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Can’t put it down!
Reviewed in the United States on March 3, 2020
I pre-ordered this book and to my delight, it had downloaded onto my Kindle last night. As with all of David’s books, it is a pleasure to read for both the recipes and the accompanying stories. I can’t wait to try the multitude of cocktails, aperitifs and decoctions. I am... See more
I pre-ordered this book and to my delight, it had downloaded onto my Kindle last night. As with all of David’s books, it is a pleasure to read for both the recipes and the accompanying stories. I can’t wait to try the multitude of cocktails, aperitifs and decoctions. I am embarrassed to admit that I fell asleep reading this delightful book, and woke up in the middle of the night cradling my Kindle! This will come as no surprise to other fans of David’s previous books.
14 people found this helpful
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Amy Nemeth
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Transport to Paris with David Leibovitz... Again :)
Reviewed in the United States on March 10, 2020
I love all of Lebovitz’s book- this one is no exception. I am utterly transported back to Paris while reading his book, “Drinking French.” The book (like his others) is not just a compendium of recipes, but reads part history, part personal journal, part instruction manual,... See more
I love all of Lebovitz’s book- this one is no exception. I am utterly transported back to Paris while reading his book, “Drinking French.” The book (like his others) is not just a compendium of recipes, but reads part history, part personal journal, part instruction manual, with plenty of humor and cultural insight. I adore this book. If you like this, you must buy another of his books, “My Paris Kitchen,” which I also read and reread. Highly recommend!
13 people found this helpful
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Wanderlugs
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Quarantine is Saved!
Reviewed in the United States on July 30, 2020
I am a longtime fan of David Lebovitz, and DANG he hit it out of the park AGAIN with this one. I normally don''t use sports metaphors but here''s another one - it''s a SLAM DUNK!! I bought this book for my husband for his birthday, and we arranged for a big curbside pickup... See more
I am a longtime fan of David Lebovitz, and DANG he hit it out of the park AGAIN with this one. I normally don''t use sports metaphors but here''s another one - it''s a SLAM DUNK!! I bought this book for my husband for his birthday, and we arranged for a big curbside pickup of French liquors and aperitifs to get started. Every night at 5 pm we have apero hour, and I''ve made at least a dozen cocktails from this book, as well as homemade grenadine and mint syrup, spiced nut mix, gougeres... everything has been fabulous and something to look forward to at the start of each quarantine evening. We had to buy a second bottle of Lillet. I can''t wait to make my own vermouth.
6 people found this helpful
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Someone
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Everyone should own a copy!
Reviewed in the United States on March 5, 2020
This is an amazing book! If you are even remotely interested in French food and culture, this book focusing on all manner of drinks ranging from coffee to tea to beer and wine will suck you in with David Lebovitz’s witty, breezy writing that will have you fighting to put it... See more
This is an amazing book! If you are even remotely interested in French food and culture, this book focusing on all manner of drinks ranging from coffee to tea to beer and wine will suck you in with David Lebovitz’s witty, breezy writing that will have you fighting to put it down. But the real focus is on the dizzying number of liquors produced in France and all the history behind these beloved and storied brands. The accompanying cocktail recipes, and bountiful number of color photographs make this book a must have as well as a must give gift!
9 people found this helpful
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Renee I.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fabulous French Cocktails and More!
Reviewed in the United States on May 10, 2020
A well researched, insider''s look at the Paris cocktail scene both of long ago and now. David''s wonderful new book highlights many classics of Paris'' Bistrot while introducing readers to innovative newcomers as well. You''ll be drinking Kir Royals and cooking up Elderflower... See more
A well researched, insider''s look at the Paris cocktail scene both of long ago and now. David''s wonderful new book highlights many classics of Paris'' Bistrot while introducing readers to innovative newcomers as well. You''ll be drinking Kir Royals and cooking up Elderflower Cordial''s in no time! Not to mention, making lists of bars to visit and bottles to purchase on your next Paris trip. There''s also some non-alcohol drinks and a whole chapter dedicated to snacks to keep your appetite satiated while you flex some cocktail shaking muscles. Be sure to watch him on Instagram Live (also some archived to his feed) too where you can see him make several recipes from the book and meet some of the professional bartenders and producers featured as well. It''s been a life saver during these long days at home! Really looking forward to my next trip to Paris!
2 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Perfect Book for Quarantine Cocktails
Reviewed in the United States on December 19, 2020
This book has been a bright spot of 2020. I''ve ordered and brought many cocktail books in the past, and they have always been too complicated, required too many expensive ingredients and not accessible. This book puts all those other books to shame and has allowed me to... See more
This book has been a bright spot of 2020. I''ve ordered and brought many cocktail books in the past, and they have always been too complicated, required too many expensive ingredients and not accessible. This book puts all those other books to shame and has allowed me to up my cocktail game, without spending a fortune on fancy liquors I''ll only use once. Yes there are some liquors in the book that aren''t very available to Americans, and a few liquors that are expensive, but I''ve still been able to make a majority of the cocktails in the book regardless Sometimes I was skeptical about how the ingredients would taste, and was pleasantly surprised. I''ve also enjoyed being introduced to liquors I would never thought about buying which are very good and inexpensive. If you like making cocktails you need this book, not to mention David is a great writer and the book is fun to read.
2 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

sophie
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
not enough cocktails
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 16, 2020
book not much good to me, has not even got a Negroni cocktail in it wish I had not bought it. very expensive book.
3 people found this helpful
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Desperate Reader
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
accesible recipes
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 22, 2020
Love this book, lots of information about the history and culture of French drinking with an emphasis on aperitifs and cocktails. The recipes are practical and achievable at home, it''s not all about alcohol, and it''s a lovely book to read.
One person found this helpful
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P Lyons Lewis
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This is perfect for Corona virus lockdown
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 9, 2020
David''s book is full of facinating history of French drinking and drinks. I particularly like the recipe section which gives you the necessary knowledge to make your own herbal drinks and cheeky infusions. 5 stars.
One person found this helpful
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ProvenceCalling.com
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Every cocktail is a sensory delight
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 21, 2020
It has taught me what to do with all the strange bottles I see on the French supermarket shelf. Never has an education tasted so good!
One person found this helpful
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joanne athey
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fabulous Book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 20, 2020
Fabulous book !
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Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale

Drinking online French: The Iconic outlet sale Cocktails, Apéritifs, and Café Traditions of France, with 160 Recipes outlet sale