Koreatown: discount A high quality Cookbook sale

Koreatown: discount A high quality Cookbook sale

Koreatown: discount A high quality Cookbook sale
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Description

Product Description

A New York Times bestseller and one of the most praised Korean cookbooks of all time, you''ll explore the foods and flavors of Koreatowns across America through this collection of 100 recipes.

This is not your average "journey to Asia" cookbook.  Koreatown is a spicy, funky, flavor-packed love affair with the grit and charm of Korean cooking in America. Koreatowns around the country are synonymous with mealtime feasts and late-night chef hangouts, and Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard show us why through stories, interviews, and over 100 delicious, super-approachable recipes.

It''s spicy, it''s fermented, it''s sweet and savory and loaded with umami: Korean cuisine is poised to break out in the U.S., but until now, the cookbooks have been focused on taking readers on an idealized Korean journey.  Koreatown, though, is all about what''s real and happening right here: the foods of Korean American communities all over our country, from L.A. to New York City, from Atlanta to Chicago. We follow Rodbard and Hong through those communities with stories and recipes for everything from beloved Korean barbecue favorites like bulgogi and kalbi to the lesser-known but deeply satisfying stews, soups, noodles, salads, drinks, and the many kimchis of the Korean American table.

Review

"Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard have given us a deep and important look at the people, places and cuisine that are reshaping what we want for dinner. Koreatown thrills with flavors that will change your life." -- Anthony Bourdain
 
"Koreatown is not a place. It’s an energy, an attitude, a painstaking stew of spice and frugality and brutally honest flavors. For the first time, here’s a book that captures all of its electricity and mystery in a voice that is both vibrant and respectful." -- Edward Lee, chef and author of Smoke and Pickles
 
"Eating Korean food is the best legal high in the world and  Koreatown is the gateway drug you need!" -- Gary Shteyngart, author of The Russian Debutante''s Handbook and Little Failure: A Memoir 
 
"The food of Korea is complex, and becomes fully realized in this amazing new book by Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard. With a thrilling new voice and original ideas, this is not the same boring "ethnic eats explainer" that is often used as an excuse to profile a country''s cuisine. I couldn’t put it down, and can''t wait to start cooking from these pages. Bibimbap for the win!" -- Andrew Zimmern, author and television host

"Deuki Hong is making great Korean food, and not just for Koreans." -- David Chang Chef/Founder of Momofuku

“Thanks to this cookbook, I can finally make all the dishes at home that I obsess over when I visit Koreatown. It’s amazing to have all these mysteriously delicious recipes in one place.” -- Sean Brock, chef and author of Heritage

"
Unwrap the world of Korean-American food through a guide demystifying the cuisine of fire and fermentation ."  --The New York Times

"A great book whether you''re new to Korean food or looking for recipes for old favorites, Koreatown will have you running to your local Asian grocery to stock up on rice cakes, gochujang, and kimchi. Or, better yet, making your own kimchi from scratch." — Epicurious

"The evangelists Korean food needs to become the next big cuisine." Tasting Table

"The last Korean cookbook that you will ever need."   Vice 

"In the burgeoning genre of cookbooks written as much to be read as to be cooked from, Koreatown paints a portrait of America''s vibrant Korean-American communities and invites a broad audience to experiment with this style of cooking." Eater

"Korean food is built on bold flavors: spicy pickled vegetables, sweet, smoky meats and pungent, salty stews. That can be a little intimidating for some American diners. But the authors of Koreatown have changed that."    NPR "Morning Edition"

"A detailed and sharply written collection that includes nearly 100 recipes, as well as photos, short essays, and interviews that explore various K-towns across the U.S." -- Publishers Weekly(starred review)

About the Author

Deuki Hong is a Korean-American executive chef and owner of Sunday Bird in San Francisco, CA, who has been recognized as an Eater Young Gun, Zagat 30 under 30, and Forbes'' 30 under 30. A graduate of The Culinary Institute of America, Deuki first began working as a line cook under Aarón Sánchez at Centrico in New York City, then went on to work at Momofuku and Michelin three-starred Jean-Georges. He was also the executive chef of Manhattan''s Kang Ho Dong Baekjeong, which caught the attention of top chefs including Anthony Bourdain, Benu''s Corey Lee, and his old boss, David Chang. In 2017, he launched Sunday Hospitality Group -- a collective of restaurants and chefs rooted in the definition of a neighborhood restaurant, which includes hit spots Sunday in Brooklyn, Rule of Thirds, Sibling Rival, and Pilot. He is also the co-author of the New
York Time''s Best Seller, Koreatown: A Cookbook.
 
Matt Rodbard is the founding editor in chief of the James Beard Award-winning online food magazine TASTE and the coauthor of Koreatown: A Cookbook, a New York Times best seller. His latest book, Food IQ, will be released in 2022. He''s been published in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Bon Appétit, Saveur, GQ, Travel + Leisure, and Lucky Peach. He is the host of the TASTE Podcast, a show featuring interviews with thought leaders in food and media.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Our Mildly Insane Kimchi Bokkeumbap
김치볶음밥
KIMCHI FRIED RICE
 
Bacon. We kept coming back to bacon when talking about this kimchi fried-rice recipe. Bacon is quintessential Americana. Our kimchi fried rice needed bacon, and for months we tested and were continually disappointed that the essence of bacon—Americana!—was being muted by either too much rice or too much kimchi. Then it came to us. We needed to use more bacon! Like a lot more. Like how French chefs view mashed potatoes: equal parts butter and potatoes. That’s scary, right? Also scary good.
We went that direction here and by the grace of god and Allan Benton did this ever work. The crispy rice unites with the decadent gochujang butter, while the bacon is there just being wonderful. And remember, the key to good fried rice is using cold day-old rice, which is nice and dried out and gives you a much better fry. So the next time you order takeout, get an extra order of rice and keep it in the fridge for a day or so. And if you didn’t plan ahead, no sweat. Make some rice and lay it out on a sheet tray and freeze until cold.

SERVES 2

½ pound of slab bacon, roughly chopped
1 medium onion, cut into small dice
2 garlic cloves, minced
1-inch knob of ginger, minced
1½ cups chopped extraaged
Napa Cabbage Kimchi (recipe below)
2 cups cooked rice, preferably day-old
1 tablespoon gochujang
2 tablespoons butter, softened
2 eggs, fried sunnyside up
2 scallions, sliced thin

1. In a large skillet, wok or cast-iron pan over high heat, cook the bacon, stirring, until fat is fully rendered and the bacon is barely starting to crisp. Pour out all but 2 tablespoons fat.
 
2. Add onion, garlic and ginger and sauté for 1 minute, or until very aromatic. Add chopped kimchi and rice and sauté, stirring frequently, for 4 to 5 minutes, or until very hot. Drop the heat to medium-low and flatten the rice with your spatula. Continue to cook until the bottom layer is crispy, about 2 minutes; think Spanish paella here. The longer you leave it, the more crispy the bottom will become, but be careful not to burn the garlic.
 
3. While the rice continues to crisp, in a small bowl mix together the gochujang and softened butter.
 
4. Serve from the pan or wok, topped with fried eggs, sliced scallions and gochujang butter.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
397 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

nom de plume
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Book - the Bossam recipe and method is outstanding
Reviewed in the United States on August 3, 2017
In order to get my head around Korean food, I purchased this book before a 2 1/2 week trip to Korea. Not just a cookbook, it has a lot of information, including an introduction before every recipe and short essays like "How to Cook Korean Food at Home Without Pissing... See more
In order to get my head around Korean food, I purchased this book before a 2 1/2 week trip to Korea. Not just a cookbook, it has a lot of information, including an introduction before every recipe and short essays like "How to Cook Korean Food at Home Without Pissing Off Your Neighbors." The book also has commentary (and in some cases, recipes) from culinary superstars such as Eric Ripert and David Chang.

Bear in mind that, as Hong states, this book focuses on the food found in K-towns and Korean-influenced restaurants around the US. So you''ll find that the some of the recipes are riffs on Korean food rather than traditional recipes. But they are all true to the source - this isn''t a "fusion" cookbook containing recipes for Korean Tacos and the like.

The Bossam (crispy pork belly) recipe is "the bomb", and the cooking technique really makes it happen. Rather than cooking small chunks on a tabletop grill, which was what I experienced in Korea, Hong''s method calls for boiling and then roasting a 3# piece in the oven. What makes the end result so killer is his method of pricking the skin with hundred of holes to help render the fat and crisp the skin. Cooking it in the oven also means that a tabletop grill is freed up for bulgogi or kabli or a hotpot or whatever.

If you plan to make the Bossam (and you should), here''s a tip that worked for me. Hong recommends using the point of a sharp knife or skewer to poke the tiny holes in the skin. However, you aren''t supposed to push through the skin and into the meat. I found this difficult to accomplish given the amount of pressure required to penetrate the tough pigskin. My solution was to use an oversized safety pin to do the job. I took a large, 2.5" safety pin and bent the prong to a 90 degree angle. I then gripped the pin by the body, placing my thumb on the end directly above the prong. From there, it''s fairly easy to puncture the skin by focusing your force on your thumb. In addition, using the short safety pin gives you more control than something longer like a skewer or knife, and once you puncture the skin, your knuckles will stop you from penetrating deeper into the meat. I''ve attached a few pictures of what I did; I purchased the safety pins through Amazon.

So anyway, it''s a great, fun-to-read, cookbook. And I know I''ll be returning to the pork belly technique for the rest of my life.

FYI - If you are planning a trip to Korea, or are just really interested in Korean food, I found the following resources useful during my trip:

- For traditional Korean cooking, I have enjoyed "Maangchi''s Real Korean Cooking." If you doubt her quest for authenticity, she suggests fermenting kimchi in jars that are placed on top of an electric blanket. This mimics the conditions of the heated floors that are found in traditional Korean homes. Despite this attention to detail, her recipes are simple and straightforward.

- "Eating Korea" by Graham Holiday. Having lived in Korea in the mid-90''s, the journalist/author returns and travels across Korea to document traditional foods and dying culinary techniques.

- Smart phone app: "Korean Food Guide Book" published by the Korea Foundation. It has some basic information about ingredients, methods, and tastes, but I found the alphabetical listing of ingredients to be invaluable. The press of a button translates an ingredient name from English to Korean characters (Hunminjeongeum) to the Romanized word/pronunciation. Many times I didn''t know exactly what I was eating, so I''d hand the server my iPhone, they''d select the word from the Hunminjeongeum list, and then I''d translate their selection into English. It was also great because I could then take a snapshot of the screen for future reference.

- Final tip if you travel to Korea: drink as much makgeolli as you can! Pronounce it like "broccoli" without the "r" and they''ll understand you well enough.
68 people found this helpful
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Myryah
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Get your Bibimbap on
Reviewed in the United States on March 14, 2017
Been on a major Korean food kick thanks to this cookbook. The braised tofu recipe is the best tofu I''ve ever eaten, and I''ve eaten a lot of tofu. The sesame spinach is simple and perfect, a staple. I make it turn my back for a minute and it''s gone. Beautiful photos and... See more
Been on a major Korean food kick thanks to this cookbook. The braised tofu recipe is the best tofu I''ve ever eaten, and I''ve eaten a lot of tofu. The sesame spinach is simple and perfect, a staple. I make it turn my back for a minute and it''s gone. Beautiful photos and writing. Highly recommended.
12 people found this helpful
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Maggie G
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent!
Reviewed in the United States on February 19, 2020
Excellent! I love this cookbook. Reminded me of los angeles. Very current and hip, yet with classic foods and seasoning.
Find out how to easily you can ''kimchi'' anything. I love to do fresh pineapple.
Have fun with this cookbook!
3 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If you LOVE Korean food and want to make it at home
Reviewed in the United States on February 22, 2017
I used to live and work near a major metro Koreatown, and I miss the food! This book has been a godsend with enabling me to make korean food at home that matches my experiences in Korean restaurants. I''ve since made many delightful bowls of soup, kimchi far better than what... See more
I used to live and work near a major metro Koreatown, and I miss the food! This book has been a godsend with enabling me to make korean food at home that matches my experiences in Korean restaurants. I''ve since made many delightful bowls of soup, kimchi far better than what I can buy at the nearest Hmart, and my pajeon is awesome.
10 people found this helpful
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Samuel
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Hard to use measurements
Reviewed in the United States on August 5, 2021
Many of the recipes use measurements that are either inconvenient or are just flat out wrong. I keep trying the recipes but they always turn out with awful proportions because the measurements listed are simply wrong. I''ve had to annotate the book with the measurements I... See more
Many of the recipes use measurements that are either inconvenient or are just flat out wrong. I keep trying the recipes but they always turn out with awful proportions because the measurements listed are simply wrong. I''ve had to annotate the book with the measurements I found to work better or at all. Don''t buy this book if you don''t want to have to figure out the recipe proportions yourself
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Cultural lessons
Reviewed in the United States on September 2, 2021
Goes a long long way to explain cultural and food traditions, history, providing an excellent grounding in Korean foods. Essential guide to learning a new often intimidating culture. Photos are lovely and individual contributions by chefs invaluable. Love this book.
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Cyndi White
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I''m not disappointed with any of the recipes
Reviewed in the United States on July 20, 2018
I own many ethnic cookbooks but none on Korean cooking. I saw these chefs on a TV program and realized I had to have this cookbook. I''m not disappointed with any of the recipes. Great addition to my collection.
One person found this helpful
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tiffany
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United States on December 26, 2017
my husband loves this book
3 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Lancs
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 15, 2017
Great book some interesing reciepes look forward to working my way through this
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totalkitchen
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 20, 2018
Great book. If you like Korean food buy it!
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N J Brown
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Xmas present. Arrived on time. Hardback,
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 20, 2016
Xmas present. Arrived on time. Hardback, looks good
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no way
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Nice
Reviewed in Germany on February 13, 2017
Love the Pics and the Ingredients & Equipment Part. The recipes provided are great, nicely written intros by Deuki and Mat. Great Stories of Korean/Americans celebrating their heritage. but there is a big BUT for me......well for my opinion there is: . too much name...See more
Love the Pics and the Ingredients & Equipment Part. The recipes provided are great, nicely written intros by Deuki and Mat. Great Stories of Korean/Americans celebrating their heritage. but there is a big BUT for me......well for my opinion there is: . too much name dropping, you guys don''t need all the names to get a reputation, .....too much recipes for drinks, Subak Soju? too many fusion recipes by guest chefs.dont get me wrong I love Chang, Rippert, Bowie and the others ( even I dont know half of them, maybe I must mention that I''m from Europe?!) but rather should have brought more Traditional recipes. The Book ends for me after page 197 from 267. Still looking for a more comprehensive recipe collection.
3 people found this helpful
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Lina
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Damaged book
Reviewed in Canada on September 7, 2019
I bought this book as a gift. It’s one thing the corner is damaged from shipping. But it’s very embracing to give a gift when the inside of the book is ripped. I didn’t open it thinking that a brand new book should be fine.
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Our Mildly Insane Kimchi Bokkeumbap


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Koreatown: discount A high quality Cookbook sale

Koreatown: discount A high quality Cookbook sale

Koreatown: discount A high quality Cookbook sale

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