The Glass new arrival Castle: A Memoir (Scribner 2021 Classics) online sale

The Glass new arrival Castle: A Memoir (Scribner 2021 Classics) online sale

The Glass new arrival Castle: A Memoir (Scribner 2021 Classics) online sale
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Description

Product Description

MORE THAN EIGHT YEARS ON THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER LIST

The extraordinary, one-of-a-kind, “nothing short of spectacular” (Entertainment Weekly) memoir from one of the world’s most gifted storytellers.

The Glass Castle is a remarkable memoir of resilience and redemption, and a revelatory look into a family at once deeply dysfunctional and uniquely vibrant. When sober, Jeannette’s brilliant and charismatic father captured his children’s imagination, teaching them physics, geology, and how to embrace life fearlessly. But when he drank, he was dishonest and destructive. Her mother was a free spirit who abhorred the idea of domesticity and didn’t want the responsibility of raising a family.

The Walls children learned to take care of themselves. They fed, clothed, and protected one another, and eventually found their way to New York. Their parents followed them, choosing to be homeless even as their children prospered.

The Glass Castle is truly astonishing—a memoir permeated by the intense love of a peculiar but loyal family.

The memoir was also made into a major motion picture from Lionsgate in 2017 starring Brie Larson, Woody Harrelson, and Naomi Watts.

Review

"Jeannette Walls has carved a story with precision and grace out of one of the most chaotic, heartbreaking childhoods ever to be set down on the page. This deeply affecting memoir is a triumph in every possible way, and it does what all good books should: it affirms our faith in the human spirit."
-- Dani Shapiro, author of Family History

"The Glass Castle is the saga of the restless, indomitable Walls family, led by a grand eccentric and his tempestuous artist wife. Jeannette Walls has survived poverty, fires, and near starvation to triumph. She has written this amazing tale with honesty and love."
-- Patricia Bosworth, author of Anything Your Little Heart Desires and Diane Arbus: A Biography

"Just read the first pages of The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls, and I defy you not to go on. It''s funny and sad and quirky and loving. I was incredibly touched by it."
-- Dominick Dunne, author of The Way We Lived Then: Recollections of a Well-Known Name Dropper

About the Author

Jeannette Walls graduated from Barnard College and was a journalist in New York. Her memoir, The Glass Castle, has been a New York Times bestseller for more than six years. She is also the author of the instant New York Times bestsellers The Silver Star and  Half Broke Horses, which was named one of the ten best books of 2009 by the editors of The New York Times Book Review. Walls lives in rural Virginia with her husband, the writer John Taylor.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1: A Woman on the Street

I was sitting in a taxi, wondering if I had overdressed for the evening, when I looked out the window and saw Mom rooting through a Dumpster. It was just after dark. A blustery March wind whipped the steam coming out of the manholes, and people hurried along the sidewalks with their collars turned up. I was stuck in traffic two blocks from the party where I was heading.

Mom stood fifteen feet away. She had tied rags around her shoulders to keep out the spring chill and was picking through the trash while her dog, a black-and-white terrier mix, played at her feet. Mom''s gestures were all familiar -- the way she tilted her head and thrust out her lower lip when studying items of potential value that she''d hoisted out of the Dumpster, the way her eyes widened with childish glee when she found something she liked. Her long hair was streaked with gray, tangled and matted, and her eyes had sunk deep into their sockets, but still she reminded me of the mom she''d been when I was a kid, swan-diving off cliffs and painting in the desert and reading Shakespeare aloud. Her cheekbones were still high and strong, but the skin was parched and ruddy from all those winters and summers exposed to the elements. To the people walking by, she probably looked like any of the thousands of homeless people in New York City.

It had been months since I laid eyes on Mom, and when she looked up, I was overcome with panic that she''d see me and call out my name, and that someone on the way to the same party would spot us together and Mom would introduce herself and my secret would be out.

I slid down in the seat and asked the driver to turn around and take me home to Park Avenue.

The taxi pulled up in front of my building, the doorman held the door for me, and the elevator man took me up to my floor. My husband was working late, as he did most nights, and the apartment was silent except for the click of my heels on the polished wood floor. I was still rattled from seeing Mom, the unexpectedness of coming across her, the sight of her rooting happily through the Dumpster. I put some Vivaldi on, hoping the music would settle me down.

I looked around the room. There were the turn-of-the-century bronze-and-silver vases and the old books with worn leather spines that I''d collected at flea markets. There were the Georgian maps I''d had framed, the Persian rugs, and the overstuffed leather armchair I liked to sink into at the end of the day. I''d tried to make a home for myself here, tried to turn the apartment into the sort of place where the person I wanted to be would live. But I could never enjoy the room without worrying about Mom and Dad huddled on a sidewalk grate somewhere. I fretted about them, but I was embarrassed by them, too, and ashamed of myself for wearing pearls and living on Park Avenue while my parents were busy keeping warm and finding something to eat.

What could I do? I''d tried to help them countless times, but Dad would insist they didn''t need anything, and Mom would ask for something silly, like a perfume atomizer or a membership in a health club. They said that they were living the way they wanted to.

After ducking down in the taxi so Mom wouldn''t see me, I hated myself -- hated my antiques, my clothes, and my apartment. I had to do something, so I called a friend of Mom''s and left a message. It was our system of staying in touch. It always took Mom a few days to get back to me, but when I heard from her, she sounded, as always, cheerful and casual, as though we''d had lunch the day before. I told her I wanted to see her and suggested she drop by the apartment, but she wanted to go to a restaurant. She loved eating out, so we agreed to meet for lunch at her favorite Chinese restaurant.

Mom was sitting at a booth, studying the menu, when I arrived. She''d made an effort to fix herself up. She wore a bulky gray sweater with only a few light stains, and black leather men''s shoes. She''d washed her face, but her neck and temples were still dark with grime.

She waved enthusiastically when she saw me. "It''s my baby girl!" she called out. I kissed her cheek. Mom had dumped all the plastic packets of soy sauce and duck sauce and hot-and-spicy mustard from the table into her purse. Now she emptied a wooden bowl of dried noodles into it as well. "A little snack for later on," she explained.

We ordered. Mom chose the Seafood Delight. "You know how I love my seafood," she said.

She started talking about Picasso. She''d seen a retrospective of his work and decided he was hugely overrated. All the cubist stuff was gimmicky, as far as she was concerned. He hadn''t really done anything worthwhile after his Rose Period.

"I''m worried about you," I said. "Tell me what I can do to help."

Her smile faded. "What makes you think I need your help?"

"I''m not rich," I said. "But I have some money. Tell me what it is you need."

She thought for a moment. "I could use an electrolysis treatment."

"Be serious."

"I am serious. If a woman looks good, she feels good."

"Come on, Mom." I felt my shoulders tightening up, the way they invariably did during these conversations. "I''m talking about something that could help you change your life, make it better."

"You want to help me change my life?" Mom asked. "I''m fine. You''re the one who needs help. Your values are all confused."

"Mom, I saw you picking through trash in the East Village a few days ago."

"Well, people in this country are too wasteful. It''s my way of recycling." She took a bite of her Seafood Delight. "Why didn''t you say hello?"

"I was too ashamed, Mom. I hid."

Mom pointed her chopsticks at me. "You see?" she said. "Right there. That''s exactly what I''m saying. You''re way too easily embarrassed. Your father and I are who we are. Accept it."

"And what am I supposed to tell people about my parents?"

"Just tell the truth," Mom said. "That''s simple enough."

Copyright © 2005 by Jeannette Walls

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
15,652 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

oldschool
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Can Walls be believed?
Reviewed in the United States on October 31, 2018
I began to doubt the truth of this memoir when she referred to Fish Creek Canyon, Arizona, as being West of Bullhead City. The only state West of Bullhead City is Nevada and Fish Creek Canyon is far to the East in the Superstition Mountains near Phoenix Arizona. Sloppy... See more
I began to doubt the truth of this memoir when she referred to Fish Creek Canyon, Arizona, as being West of Bullhead City. The only state West of Bullhead City is Nevada and Fish Creek Canyon is far to the East in the Superstition Mountains near Phoenix Arizona. Sloppy work. Where is the publisher''s fact-checker? If one writes about place and from place they need to know what they are talking about. I also found her descriptions of the desert generic. The Sonoran is not the northern basin-range.
110 people found this helpful
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NHS1966
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Amazing true story
Reviewed in the United States on September 9, 2017
I just love this story about growing up dirt poor in one of the poorest and most depressing coal mining towns in West Virginia. I am a West Virginian, and there were many poor and alcoholic coal miners in my family, so I can really relate to the struggles this family faced.... See more
I just love this story about growing up dirt poor in one of the poorest and most depressing coal mining towns in West Virginia. I am a West Virginian, and there were many poor and alcoholic coal miners in my family, so I can really relate to the struggles this family faced. Ms Walls does an excellent job of telling her story so the reader feels like they were there. I could feel her pain, anger and disappointment to the point that I shed tears more than once. I read the book shortly after it was published, and just read it again after seeing the movie, which was also excellent. This book is easily one of my top five best books ever.
95 people found this helpful
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CJB
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The author is dispassionate, so the reader can be angry.
Reviewed in the United States on February 19, 2018
Excellent description of places, excellent representation of how people speak, excellent presentation of the children''s growing maturity and awareness. The author writes with compassion for her parents, but as a reader this book made me angry over and over as the adults... See more
Excellent description of places, excellent representation of how people speak, excellent presentation of the children''s growing maturity and awareness. The author writes with compassion for her parents, but as a reader this book made me angry over and over as the adults indulged themselves with selfishness, immaturity, and alcoholism, leaving themselves and their children hungry and cold and the children haphazardly educated, even molested. The children''s transition from a life of abject poverty to new lives in New York City is painted with broad strokes, and I can''t help thinking there''s another book in there. They would have had to learn how to live as adults in an urban environment, how to relate to people differently, how to see themselves as something other than the bottom of the social structure. When the author presents the scene in which she learns that her mother actually had a substantial amount of money - a fact that is hinted at throughout the book - and fully understands that none of it had to happen, she handles it without anger. The closing scene with its repetition of the image, "dancing along the border between turbulence and order," is satisfying.
64 people found this helpful
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
New favorite book for me
Reviewed in the United States on November 5, 2017
I think this may be the best book I’ve ever read. I’m 60, and I read A LOT. The character Mary, in this book, at one point says she is addicted to reading. When I’ve told people that, they act like it’s a joke. This book had me back and forth, from nodding in agreement... See more
I think this may be the best book I’ve ever read. I’m 60, and I read A LOT. The character Mary, in this book, at one point says she is addicted to reading. When I’ve told people that, they act like it’s a joke. This book had me back and forth, from nodding in agreement with the sage parental advice given to the Walls children about Life...then freaking out over a little girl falling out of a moving vehicle and they don’t even know it right away! In the beginning of the story the dad spends quality time with his children. They have adventures most kids couldn’t dream of. Then he drinks up the grocery and electric bill money. The mother is ahead of her time in lots of ways. She is also neglectful and self absorbed— in shocking ways. It’s because of the many reality checks that I didn’t doubt for a minute, memoir or not, that this is a true life story. It was a very funny book. My favorite Rex Walls story was him fixing the termite ridden floor by smashing beer cans and nailing them over the holes. “Time to go her another six pack”. (There were holes left to patch). Drink a beer, patch a hole..repeat. His best line, for me, was when he is telling his daughter about quantum physics and rethinking his atheist perspective. He holds up his DT shaking hand for some reason and tells her he doesn’t know if it’s “fear of God or lack of booze”. I thought maybe the author was being a little too careful going easy on her parents—some parts of the book were heart breaking to read. In the end, though, I’m glad she left it to the reader to decide, and thank GOD it wasn’t a “poor me” story! It was just realer than real, with the opportunity, should you choose to take it, to feel hope and optimism. To believe we are right to have hope. And a job.
60 people found this helpful
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CRCGB
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
a memoir on a disfunctional family
Reviewed in the United States on November 6, 2018
Boring , boring , boring: a life with irresponsible and silly parents. I regret every cent. Could not read all, some spotty reading and eventually stashed it away.
41 people found this helpful
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E. Comella
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Disturbing depressing emotionless recounting of neglect and abuse
Reviewed in the United States on September 13, 2015
This book was disturbing and depressing. I had hoped that the author would share some sort of insight into surviving neglect and abuse, but I sensed a sort of "top this" arrogance in her writing. She described her childhood as an adventure. Her recounting was... See more
This book was disturbing and depressing. I had hoped that the author would share some sort of insight into surviving neglect and abuse, but I sensed a sort of "top this" arrogance in her writing. She described her childhood as an adventure. Her recounting was emotionless. This is not a book that will help survivors of abuse. Perhaps it is for those who never experienced such hardship and find it fascinating. I read a few chapters. Now I am deciding whether to put this book on the shelf or simply throw it in the fire.
101 people found this helpful
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JillRobert
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
... and troubling story written from a child''s perspective (my favourite kind of story)
Reviewed in the United States on August 18, 2016
This was a memorable and troubling story written from a child''s perspective (my favourite kind of story). Folks are commenting that Jeannette did not judge or condemn her parents for their miserable failings. What I suspect is simply that she was highly intelligent and... See more
This was a memorable and troubling story written from a child''s perspective (my favourite kind of story). Folks are commenting that Jeannette did not judge or condemn her parents for their miserable failings. What I suspect is simply that she was highly intelligent and had keen insight into their psychology and knew, on a deeper level than most children, they were "doing the best they could" in a sense. Only she knows what is in her heart. I got the sense she accepted and saw reality clearly. Her zest for life, insatiable curiosity and hopeful-ness in spite of her parents'' failings made her a rare exception among people who are raised in such a way, in my opinion. What I admire most about her is that she never gave up and resigned herself or allowed what was clearly abnormal to become normal.
108 people found this helpful
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Debby Bright
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wrenching Poverty in Touching Memoir
Reviewed in the United States on July 27, 2017
Jeannette Walls''s memoir focuses on her dysfunctional family life with a severely alcoholic father and an irresponsible dreamer of a mother. The poverty they experience is absolutely wrenching. Yet through it all, Jeannette and her siblings emerge as responsible... See more
Jeannette Walls''s memoir focuses on her dysfunctional family life with a severely alcoholic father and an irresponsible dreamer of a mother. The poverty they experience is absolutely wrenching. Yet through it all, Jeannette and her siblings emerge as responsible successful adults in overwhelmingly difficult circumstances. It''s a quick, wonderful read.
45 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Eliza Conquest
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An extraordinary account of parental negligence
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 2, 2017
This is a well written book and something of a page turner. The writing is vivid and I felt almost as though I was involved in this family''s life. It is a tale of terrible parental selfishness and neglect and at times made me feel so angry that people can treat their...See more
This is a well written book and something of a page turner. The writing is vivid and I felt almost as though I was involved in this family''s life. It is a tale of terrible parental selfishness and neglect and at times made me feel so angry that people can treat their children in this way. Somehow the author survives intact without any bitterness towards her unbelievably eccentric mother and drunken father, and despite everything and what they have put her through manages to still love them both. I almost had to stop reading it at one point as the mother made me feel so angry at her unspeakable selfishness and the father taking money from his teenage children who had to work part time out of school to survive, but generally the book has a happy ending - although inevitably one of the four children suffers badly, but we never know what really happens to her. Well worth reading.
14 people found this helpful
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evergreen
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A shocking true story....
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 6, 2020
An autobiographical account by the author, who was brought up by neglectful parents, who by choice lived a maverick, hand to mouth existence in America. They were both highly intelligent, creative individuals, who inherited land and property and could have given their...See more
An autobiographical account by the author, who was brought up by neglectful parents, who by choice lived a maverick, hand to mouth existence in America. They were both highly intelligent, creative individuals, who inherited land and property and could have given their children a comfortable life, yet they despised and spurned conventional lifestyles. Instead, believing themselves to be morally superior to others, they become drifters, moving from one place to another, dragging their children along with them...often living in abject poverty. The wilful neglect of the children is shocking and heart breaking. At the age of three the author receives extensive burns and nearly dies when she is allowed to use a gas hob without any parental supervision. One child does die in infancy, though it is claimed to be of natural causes (I rather doubt that given the neglect described). In addition to neglect, there is the mental torture ...one child, when in her late teens is so tormented by her mother that she stabs her and ends up spending time in jail. This is not the sort of book you are likely to "enjoy", but it is certainly worth reading. It is inspiring in so far as the surviving children come through it all and go on to lead happy and fulfilling adult lives and that is a remarkable achievement. The book also raises philosophical questions...as to what is good and bad when raising children. For instance did it widen the children''s horizons by living in so many different places? Did they in fact learn to be independent due to the neglect...ie was it good for them in some ways?. Can children be truly "happy" in such families? ...Can it be said that despite all the neglect, that underneath it all these parents loved the children? Regarding the latter, the author seems to think they did and I can understand that. But I doubt it. Yes the parents may have shown occasional kindnesses, but I can''t see that these are sufficient to compensate for the overall neglect. I might have had more sympathy for the parents if they''d had no choice...if they had done their best under difficult circumstances, if they had made an effort, but my impression from the book is that all they cared about was themselves and having their freedom to do as they pleased. I''m sorry if that is unfair and obviously I never met them and have never walked in their shoes as it were....but I just couldn''t see any love there.
4 people found this helpful
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Nettlefairy
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting, eye opening, shocking must read!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 18, 2020
Wow, what an eye opening read! It is very well written and really draws you in to her experience so that you can relate to how it must have been for her growing up like this. Shocking at times, I found myself feeling awfully frustrated with her parents! I do believe that...See more
Wow, what an eye opening read! It is very well written and really draws you in to her experience so that you can relate to how it must have been for her growing up like this. Shocking at times, I found myself feeling awfully frustrated with her parents! I do believe that they love their children in their own way but just have their own warped, weird outlook on life which is actually very damaging and worrying. It is interesting to read about all of the different places they lived in their life too, you get a real feel for the surroundings and culture of different parts of America. The Appalachian mountains included! It is an inspiration to me that this lady managed to change her life for the better despite her difficult circumstances. I’ve seen the film too, but in my opinion he book is better as there are bits that they left out in the film. Highly recommend!
3 people found this helpful
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avril phelps
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Enthralling
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 27, 2017
This book was a recommendation and not the crime thriller I usually go for and yet I was more taken by this novel, keener to get back to it than most of the thrillers I have read. There is a lot of exquisite detail. I can find lengthy descriptions boring, however well...See more
This book was a recommendation and not the crime thriller I usually go for and yet I was more taken by this novel, keener to get back to it than most of the thrillers I have read. There is a lot of exquisite detail. I can find lengthy descriptions boring, however well written, but I read every word, was not tempted to jump any passages because all the detail totally took me in. The characters are amazing. There us no sentimentality. They are fresh, irascible and authentic. Their lives astound and horrifying. Foolhardy, reckless, insanely brave. Extreme hardship is accepted with a matter of fact equanimity and the job of survival undertaken with resolute perseverance. Essentially it is the integrity of the characters in all their waywardness in the cases of the mother and father and the solid endurance of the main protagonist that have left a lasting impression on me.
7 people found this helpful
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Jenbo
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Astounding
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 15, 2020
Almost impossible to believe that 3 children raised in such tough circumstances could all achieve their dreams to such enormous extent. No doubt that there was a lot taught about values and courage even if the parents didn''t practice them, themselves. The mother''s rigidity...See more
Almost impossible to believe that 3 children raised in such tough circumstances could all achieve their dreams to such enormous extent. No doubt that there was a lot taught about values and courage even if the parents didn''t practice them, themselves. The mother''s rigidity around keeping property "in the family" whilst allowing her children to go hungry for most of the time was senseless to say the least as was her inability to to rouse herself to work. Whilst this is a miraculous story for the children, I think it''s fair and very sad to say that they are exceptional.
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The Glass new arrival Castle: A Memoir (Scribner 2021 Classics) online sale

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