The online sale Yellow online Rain outlet sale

The online sale Yellow online Rain outlet sale

The online sale Yellow online Rain outlet sale

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Ainielle is a village high in the Spanish Pyrenees. Its houses are mostly deserted ruins and have been for years. Ainielle''s last surviving inhabitant, an old man at death''s door, lingers on, and as the "yellow rain" of leaves flutters around him and the first snows of the year fall, he recalls the life he lived and the ghosts-once his friends and neighbors-who have taken possession of his solitude.
Hailed on first publication and continuously reprinted in Spain, The Yellow Rain is a haunting ode to the power of memory, an elegy for a landscape and a way of life.

From Publishers Weekly

In this somber and elegiac novel, Llamazares''s first to be translated into English, the last, dying resident of a deserted village in the Spanish Pyrenees, "forgotten by everyone, condemned to gnaw away at my memory and my bones like an old dog," summons the ghosts of his past. The closing of the local mill sent Ainielle''s population to other towns, until only the elderly narrator and his wife, Sabine, remained. Lonely and grieving, Sabine killed herself, and the old man is left with only his loyal, sorrowful dog. Now, on what seems to be his final night on earth, he recalls the tragedies that have befallen him: his daughter, Sara, died when she was only four; the Spanish Civil War claimed his son Camilo; and his other beloved son, Andres (the narrator''s namesake), "abandoned" his family to seek his fortune. The old man has never forgiven Andres, nor anyone else who left the village to rot, its houses collapsing "like an animal felled by a bullet." Llamazares''s gorgeous prose evokes the empty streets and desolate landscape as effectively as it suggests ambiguities in the narrative''s truth: is Andr‚s the elder a crazy, potentially dangerous man who sees visions of the dead? Or is he himself a ghost? A gorgeous, heartbreaking meditation on memory and solitude, and a poetic accounting of physical and spiritual decay, Llamazares''s slender novel transports readers to a grim and unforgettable world.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Reminiscent of Camus'' A Happy Death (1972) in its poetic language and existential pondering, The Yellow Rain is a poignant, fictionalized memoir. Llamazares depicts the sad life of a man who has lived a full, and largely tragic life, and now faces death, the last holdout in Ainielle, a crumbling Spanish mountain town. Llamazares surprises with his ability to create dramatic tension in this soliloquy-style narrative through vivid description, attention to all the senses, and the detailed reenactment of past scenes. While the primary story consists of the protagonist''s personal reflections, this is also the story of a village abandoned in the wake of civil war and progress, now, like him, facing extinction. Memories rain down in Ainielle, pouring through doors and windows, haunting the streets, and staining everything with the aged yellow color of time''s passage. From utter loneliness to ghostly visions to near madness, Llamazares tackles the things that come to us--memory, feelings, visions, dreams--and cannot easily be washed away. Janet St. John
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

European PRAISE FOR THE YELLOW RAIN
"A beautiful book, a somber memoir and moving elegy for a lost part of the world."-Le Monde (France)

"Recalls the work of García Márquez. But here the baroque has been replaced by a shuddering lyricism."-El Periodico (Spain)

About the Author

Born in the now-vanished town of Vegémian in 1955, Julio Llamazares is one of Europe''s most celebrated writers. He has written novels, poetry, and several travel books and is a regular contributor to El Pais. He lives in Madrid.

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4.2 out of 54.2 out of 5
12 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

debra crosby
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Time Is a Patient Yellow Rain
Reviewed in the United States on February 22, 2004
This book, a compelling and poignant elegy to both a vanished village and dying way of life, is one of the most beautifully written and sorrowful books I have ever read on the power of memory. Andres, the last surviving inhabitant of Ainielle, a small village in the... See more
This book, a compelling and poignant elegy to both a vanished village and dying way of life, is one of the most beautifully written and sorrowful books I have ever read on the power of memory. Andres, the last surviving inhabitant of Ainielle, a small village in the Spanish Pyrenees, has been alone for years, with only his loyal dog, and the ghosts of his family and fellow villagers, for company. On what he believes to be his last day on earth, he recounts the slow, steady decay of his home and his village, the loss of his friends and family, and in the process tells us much about himself. The "yellow rain" of the Poplar leaves is compared to both time -- "like a patient yellow rain that . . .douses the fiercest of fires" -- and death. As he watches his village die, Andres laments the loss of his own life as well. His entire life has been one of loss -- of his young daughter to disease, of one son to the Civil War and another who leaves, never to be forgiven or come back, and of his wife, to suicide. What she cannot bear, Andres stubbornly suffers through. He loves his village as he loved his family, but is powerless to stop its destruction by nature and time. And ultimately he knows that he, too, must die, ultimately becoming a part of the past. Though the images of destruction and decay are strong and ominpresent, they nonetheless mingle with those of rebirth and growth; the life cycle is complete. The nature that destroys during the winter also comes alive again each spring.
Andres comes to accept the fact that the ghosts of his past now dwell with him, and he himself then becomes a ghost, wandering through the streets of the old village and its surrounding hills, sometimes losing himself in time and place. He knows that his life is over and he finally comes to accept the loss of hope that his village will ever revive.
This book is beautifully written -- the language poetic and rich, the symbols and images both stark and gently evocative. The past dwells with Andres, as it does for all of us, in the present, living on in memory and in dreams.
My Spanish is not good enough to read Mr. Llamazares in his native tongue, so I can only hope that, in the future, there will be other translations of his works for me to read. This lovely little book is a perfect introduction to his writing.
7 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great read!
Reviewed in the United States on January 25, 2018
I had not read any work by Llamazares in the past. I received a recommendation regarding The Yellow Rain and decided to go with it. A wonderful read. Even magical! I was spellbound and could not put the book down. Now I just have to find other English translations of... See more
I had not read any work by Llamazares in the past. I received a recommendation regarding The Yellow Rain and decided to go with it. A wonderful read. Even magical! I was spellbound and could not put the book down. Now I just have to find other English translations of Llamazares'' work.
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Mary Whipple
5.0 out of 5 stars
A modern classic, an elegy for a vanished way of life.
Reviewed in the United States on September 14, 2005
This powerful and richly atmospheric novel, a classic in Spain for the past fifteen years but only now translated into English, captures the love of an old man for his land and for the village in which he and his ancestors were born. It is also a study of the inexorable... See more
This powerful and richly atmospheric novel, a classic in Spain for the past fifteen years but only now translated into English, captures the love of an old man for his land and for the village in which he and his ancestors were born. It is also a study of the inexorable effects of time and the pressures it exerts on isolated communities and the human inhabitants who lack direct connection with a wider world. Told from the point of view of the elderly Andres, the last remaining inhabitant of a crumbling village in the Pyrenees, the novel details his physical and emotional deterioration as he observes the parallel collapse of the town, "whole buildings kneeling like cattle," the village itself a mangled and sad "unburied corpse."

As the novel opens, Andres tells us that this is the last day of his life, describing what the men approaching from the nearest town will discover when they come to Ainielle for the first time in ten years. Gradually, Andres reveals the history of the village and of his own family, capturing his own desolation and possible madness. His confrontations with ghosts--of his mother, his three children, and wife Sabina--slowly reveal his life as a family man, along with his disappointments, his sometimes self-defeating behavior, and his never-ending desire to keep alive the village in which his ancestors worked the land. He knows that when he dies, any remaining vestiges of the village and its way of life will disappear from the earth.

Andres''s memories and his confrontations with ghosts add color, variety, and a sense of drama to what would otherwise be an interior monologue, showing the conflict between Andres and the forces of change. His preparations for his own death and description of the images the approaching visitors will see on their arrival constitute the quiet climax. The imagery is breath-taking. Realistic and grounded in the stark reality of farm life in a poor, nearly dead village, the nature imagery reveals parallels between the inner forces which have driven Andres to become the last human in Ainielle, and the passage of time and the seasons--deep snow, the rushing water of spring, and the falling poplar leaves, which he sees as "the yellow rain."

A haunting memorial to those people who are incapable of accepting the changes of time, the novel forces the reader to consider those values and aspects of the past which are lost from our heritage when the memories and experiences of the elderly are not preserved, when old villages disappear, and when future generations do not care. Mary Whipple
5 people found this helpful
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Mary Whipple
5.0 out of 5 stars
An elegy for a vanished way of life---a modern Spanish classic.
Reviewed in the United States on December 7, 2005
This powerful and richly atmospheric novel, a classic in Spain for the past fifteen years but only now translated into English, captures the love of an old man for his land and for the village in which he and his ancestors were born. It is also a study of the inexorable... See more
This powerful and richly atmospheric novel, a classic in Spain for the past fifteen years but only now translated into English, captures the love of an old man for his land and for the village in which he and his ancestors were born. It is also a study of the inexorable effects of time and the pressures it exerts on isolated communities and the human inhabitants who lack direct connection with a wider world. Told from the point of view of the elderly Andres, the last remaining inhabitant of a crumbling village in the Pyrenees, the novel details his physical and emotional deterioration as he observes the parallel collapse of the town, "whole buildings kneeling like cattle," the village itself a mangled and sad "unburied corpse."

As the novel opens, Andres tells us that this is the last day of his life, describing what the men approaching from the nearest town will discover when they come to Ainielle for the first time in ten years. Gradually, Andres reveals the history of the village and of his own family, capturing his own desolation and possible madness. His confrontations with ghosts--of his mother, his three children, and wife Sabina--slowly reveal his life as a family man, along with his disappointments, his sometimes self-defeating behavior, and his never-ending desire to keep alive the village in which his ancestors worked the land. He knows that when he dies, any remaining vestiges of the village and its way of life will disappear from the earth.

Andres''s memories and his confrontations with ghosts add color, variety, and a sense of drama to what would otherwise be an interior monologue, showing the conflict between Andres and the forces of change. His preparations for his own death and description of the images the approaching visitors will see on their arrival constitute the quiet climax. The imagery is breath-taking. Realistic and grounded in the stark reality of farm life in a poor, nearly dead village, the nature imagery reveals parallels between the inner forces which have driven Andres to become the last human in Ainielle, and the passage of time and the seasons--deep snow, the rushing water of spring, and the falling poplar leaves, which he sees as "the yellow rain."

A haunting memorial to those people who are incapable of accepting the changes of time, the novel forces the reader to consider those values and aspects of the past which are lost from our heritage when the memories and experiences of the elderly are not preserved, when old villages disappear, and when future generations do not care. Mary Whipple
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Mary Whipple
5.0 out of 5 stars
A modern classic, an elegy for a vanished way of life.
Reviewed in the United States on January 17, 2004
This powerful and richly atmospheric novel, a classic in Spain for the past fifteen years but only now translated into English, captures the love of an old man for his land and for the village in which he and his ancestors were born. It is also a study of the inexorable... See more
This powerful and richly atmospheric novel, a classic in Spain for the past fifteen years but only now translated into English, captures the love of an old man for his land and for the village in which he and his ancestors were born. It is also a study of the inexorable effects of time and the pressures it exerts on isolated communities and the human inhabitants who lack direct connection with a wider world. Told from the point of view of the elderly Andres, the last remaining inhabitant of a crumbling village in the Pyrenees, the novel details his physical and emotional deterioration as he observes the parallel collapse of the town, "whole buildings kneeling like cattle," the village itself a mangled and sad "unburied corpse."
As the novel opens, Andres tells us that this is the last day of his life, describing what the men approaching from the nearest town will discover when they come to Ainielle for the first time in ten years. Gradually, Andres reveals the history of the village and of his own family, capturing his own desolation and possible madness. His confrontations with ghosts--of his mother, his three children, and wife Sabina--slowly reveal his life as a family man, along with his disappointments, his sometimes self-defeating behavior, and his never-ending desire to keep alive the village in which his ancestors worked the land. He knows that when he dies, any remaining vestiges of the village and its way of life will disappear from the earth.
Andres''s memories and his confrontations with ghosts add color, variety, and a sense of drama to what would otherwise be an interior monologue, showing the conflict between Andres and the forces of change. His preparations for his own death and description of the images the approaching visitors will see on their arrival constitute the quiet climax. The imagery is breath-taking. Realistic and grounded in the stark reality of farm life in a poor, nearly dead village, the nature imagery reveals parallels between the inner forces which have driven Andres to become the last human in Ainielle, and the passage of time and the seasons--deep snow, the rushing water of spring, and the falling poplar leaves, which he sees as "the yellow rain." A haunting memorial to those people who are incapable of accepting the changes of time, the novel forces the reader to consider those values and aspects of the past which are lost from our heritage when the memories and experiences of the elderly are not preserved, when old villages disappear, and when future generations do not care. Mary Whipple
8 people found this helpful
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V. Czyz
1.0 out of 5 stars
Cheap gothic
Reviewed in the United States on February 25, 2004
(...)It is neither elegaic, nor lyrical, nor in any sense compelling. I''ve been reviewing books professionally for 20 years and this is one of the worst I''ve ever had to plow through. Only 130 pages long, it still manages to be incredibly tedious. Most absurd are... See more
(...)It is neither elegaic, nor lyrical, nor in any sense compelling. I''ve been reviewing books professionally for 20 years and this is one of the worst I''ve ever had to plow through. Only 130 pages long, it still manages to be incredibly tedious. Most absurd are comparisons first to Jose Saramago, and, more absurd, to Gabriel Garcia Marquez. I don''t have a word strong enough--ludicrous comes up way short--to apply to the assertion that Llamazares is "more lyrical" than Marquez. We all know talk is cheap, so here is an example of the overwrought and image-less writing: "Almost instantaneously, I was filled by an inexplicable inner chill. The house was frozen, heavy with menace, thick with silence and dank cold." [Could an outer chill fill anyone?] This is not elegaic, it''s cheap gothic--without the fun of suspense or any genuine sense of menace. One line later, "The darkness was absolute, filling my eyes like a curse." Not only is this badly done, but also, Llamazres already used this metaphor five pages earlier: "I still had the rope with me, tied around my waist, like a rough belt or like a curse." And he will use it AGAIN later in the novel. Saramago? Marquez? This book is so badly written it is a wonder it was published at all. Llamazares uses the words silence, solitude, shadow, forever, dream, night, soul and memories--among others--so often, you begin to cringe in anticipation. Madness, for example "laid its yellow larvae in my soul" (p. 40). A rope (the one like a curse) "made an inferno of my soul" (p. 38). On p. 25, the curse-like rope made "an abyss of my soul." Need I go on? These are general and abstract words symptomatic of the writing: it lacks texture, feel, detail, LIFE.
Beyond the bad writing, however, there is NO story nor any characters! The narrator spends 130 pages whining about how he''s about to die and the village is going to die with him, but we don''t know anything else about him. We never see him or his family members (who are mere ciphers, names without anecdtoes or even physical descriptions attached to them) or the town in happier times so we really can''t care much what happens to them. NO ONE in the whole book gets a single description. I don''t think we even know what the dog looks like. We do see something of the town, but we know nothing, after 130 pages of its history or character. The Macondo of Marquez is more vividly drawn in a single paragraph of ''100 Years of Solitude''.
Worst of all is the narrator''s voice. Far from lyrical or elegaic, it is self-pitying, complaining and incredibly repetitive. If Llamazares only made his observations once (and they are hardly original or thought provoking), the book would be about 50 pages long. By the time you turn the last page, you are thankful, more than anything else, his ordeal--and yours--is over.
I found nothing redeeming between these covers and would not have gone past page 5 had I not been commissioned assignment.
You''ve been warned.
9 people found this helpful
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Elizabeth Hendry
4.0 out of 5 stars
A Haunting Story
Reviewed in the United States on April 24, 2005
The Yellow Rain is a brief novel, the recollections of an elderly man slowly dying in an abandoned village in the Spanish countryside. He imagines his own demise and tells us about it, as he imagines that the village itself is haunted by the ghosts of those who have gone... See more
The Yellow Rain is a brief novel, the recollections of an elderly man slowly dying in an abandoned village in the Spanish countryside. He imagines his own demise and tells us about it, as he imagines that the village itself is haunted by the ghosts of those who have gone before him. He, like many others he tells us about, has slowly lost his mind, the solitude has gotten to him. Llamazares'' novel is eerily entertaining, moody, evocative, with a touch of the gothic. It is an enjoyable brief read.
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nadirland@hotmail.com
1.0 out of 5 stars
A Good Subject Badly Done
Reviewed in the United States on April 5, 2004
No matter how I tried, I could not enjoy this book. I love ghost towns, ruins, sequestered villages and have logged many travel miles to visit them. This book should have been right up my cobblestone alley. Unfortunately, it is a very boring read. There isn''t much... See more
No matter how I tried, I could not enjoy this book. I love ghost towns, ruins, sequestered villages and have logged many travel miles to visit them. This book should have been right up my cobblestone alley. Unfortunately, it is a very boring read. There isn''t much description of the town beyond everything is crumbling and rotting away, there is no glimpse into the village''s hey-day so we really have no sense of loss, just a drawn-out, really dull account of the last few years of the town. It''s like listening to someone on his deathbed moan and groan for days on end until you know it would be a mercy for him to die. There''s just no atmosphere, no nostalgia, no--as I said--genuine sense of loss.
To top it all off, the book is full of dumb cliches (some cliches ARE dumber than others), like "I was staring death in the face" or "death was laughing at me", etc. I really wondered how this thing made it into print. There''s no story, not a hint of humor, no characters that come off the pages, really nothing to get attached to. I couldn''t even read it all the way through although its not even 150 pages long and the type is BIG. All I can say is if you enjoy forlorn places, as I do, and you enjoy history brought to life--or at least to art--you will be really disappointed with this one.
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Top reviews from other countries

31001
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Just an unbelievable novel. The narrator lives in an ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 29, 2016
Just an unbelievable novel. The narrator lives in an isolated village thatt over the years sees it''s inhabitants leave until the only one left there is the narrator himself, although we can''t be sure that the narrator is not telling the story from beyond the grave....See more
Just an unbelievable novel. The narrator lives in an isolated village thatt over the years sees it''s inhabitants leave until the only one left there is the narrator himself, although we can''t be sure that the narrator is not telling the story from beyond the grave. Incredibly melancholic, the book looks at the emotional, social effects of society''s flight to the cities. *applause* *throws bouquet of flowers*
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The online sale Yellow online Rain outlet sale

The online sale Yellow online Rain outlet sale

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The online sale Yellow online Rain outlet sale

The online sale Yellow online Rain outlet sale

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