Under the Black Flag: The Romance and the Reality of high quality Life discount Among the Pirates online

Under the Black Flag: The Romance and the Reality of high quality Life discount Among the Pirates online

Under the Black Flag: The Romance and the Reality of high quality Life discount Among the Pirates online
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“This is the most authoritative and highly literate account of these pernicious people that I have ever read.”—Patrick O''Brian

“[A] wonderfully entertaining history of pirates and piracy . . . a rip-roaring read . . . fascinating and unexpected.”—Men''s Journal

This rollicking account of the golden age of piracy is packed with vivid history and high seas adventure. David Cordingly, an acclaimed expert on pirates, reveals the spellbinding truth behind the legends of Blackbeard, Captain Kidd, Sir Francis Drake, the fierce female brigands Mary Read and Anne Bonny, and others who rode and robbed upon the world''s most dangerous waters. Here, in thrilling detail, are the weapons they used, the ships they sailed, and the ways they fought—and were defeated. Under the Black Flag also charts the paths of fictional pirates such as Captain Hook and Long John Silver. The definitive resource on the subject, this book is as captivating as it is supremely entertaining. 

Praise for Under the Black Flag

“[A] lively history . . . If you''ve ever been seduced by the myth of the cutlass-wielding pirate, consider David Cordingly''s Under the Black Flag.” USA Today, “Best Bets”

“Engagingly told . . . a tale of the power of imaginative literature to re-create the past.” Los Angeles Times

“Entirely engaging and informative . . . a witty and spirited book.” The Washington Post Book World

“Plenty of thrills and adventure to satisfy any reader.” The Philadelphia Inquirer

Review

“This is the most authoritative and highly literate account of these pernicious people that I have ever read.” —Patrick O''Brian

“[A] wonderfully entertaining history of pirates and piracy . . . a rip-roaring read . . . fascinating and unexpected.” Men''s Journal

“[A] lively history . . . If you''ve ever been seduced by the myth of the cutlass-wielding pirate, consider David Cordingly''s  Under the Black Flag.” USA Today, “Best Bets”

“Engagingly told . . . a tale of the power of imaginative literature to re-create the past.” Los Angeles Times

“Entirely engaging and informative . . . a witty and spirited book.” The Washington Post Book World

“Plenty of thrills and adventure to satisfy any reader.” The Philadelphia Inquirer

About the Author

David Cordingly was for 12 years on the staff of the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, England, where he was curator of paintings and then head of exhibitions. He is a graduate of Oxford and the renowned author of the definitive book on pirates, Under the Black Flag, as well as Seafaring Women and Cochrane: The Real Master and Commander. Cordingly lives with his wife by the sea in Sussex, England.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

1
 
Wooden Legs and Parrots
 
Robert Louis Stevenson was thirty years old when he began writing Treasure Island. It was his first success as a novelist, and although Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and The Master of Ballantrae are considered finer works by many critics, it is the book with which his name is indelibly associated. The first fifteen chapters were written at Braemar among the Scottish mountains in August and September 1881. The late summer weather was atrocious, and Stevenson and his family huddled around the fire in Miss Mcgregor’s cottage while the wind howled down the Dee valley and the rain beat on the windows. There were five of them staying there: Stevenson’s parents, his American wife, Fanny, and her twelve-year-old son, Lloyd Osbourne, who was Stevenson’s stepson. To pass the time, Lloyd painted pictures with a shilling box of watercolors. One afternoon Stevenson joined him and drew a map of an island. He was soon adding names to the various hills and inlets. Lloyd later wrote, “I shall never forget the thrill of Skeleton Island, Spyglass Hill, nor the heart-stirring climax of the three red crosses! And the greater climax still when he wrote down the words ‘Treasure Island’ at the top right-hand corner! And he seemed to know so much about it too—the pirates, the buried treasure, the man who had been marooned on the island.” In an essay which he wrote in the last year of his life, Stevenson revealed how the future character of the book began to appear to him as he studied the map. It was to be all about buccaneers, and a mutiny, and a fine old Squire called Trelawney, and a sea cook with one leg, and a sea song with the chorus “Yo-ho-ho and a bottle of rum.”
 
Within three days he had written three chapters, and as he wrote each chapter he read it out to the family, who, apart from Fanny, were delighted with the results and added their own suggestions. Lloyd insisted that there should be no women in the story. Stevenson’s father devised the contents of Billy Bones’ sea chest, and suggested the scene where Jim Hawkins hides in the apple barrel. During the course of the next two weeks Stevenson had a visit from Dr. Alexander Japp, who was equally enthusiastic and took the early chapters along to the editor of Young Folks magazine. He agreed to publish the story in weekly installments, but after fifteen chapters Stevenson abruptly ran out of inspiration and could write no more. The holiday in Scotland came to an end, and he moved south to Weybridge, where he corrected the proofs of the early chapters and despaired at what still remained to be done. Stevenson was the victim all his life of a chronic bronchial condition which racked him with coughing fits and hemorrhages. These frequently threatened his life and led to constant travels in search of a healing climate. He had not been well in Scotland, and it was therefore planned that he should pass the winter with Fanny and Lloyd at Davos in Switzerland. They traveled there in October, and the change of scene worked wonders. “Arrived at my destination, down I sat one morning to the unfinished tale; and behold! it flowed from me like small talk; and in a second tide of delighted industry, and again at a rate of a chapter a day, I finished Treasure Island.”
 
When it was first published in weekly installments in Young Folks magazine (from October 1881 to January 1882), it failed to attract any attention, or indeed to sell any additional copies, but when published separately as a book in 1883, it soon proved popular. The Prime Minister, Gladstone, was reported to have stayed up till two in the morning in order to finish it, and it was widely praised by literary critics and by other writers. Henry James thought it a delightful story, “all as perfect as a well-played boy’s game,” and Gerard Manley Hopkins wrote, “I think Robert Lewis Stevenson shows more genius in a page than Scott in a volume.” G. K. Chesterton particularly admired Stevenson’s evocative style: “The very words carry the sound and the significance. It is as if they were cut out with cutlasses; as was that unforgettable chip or wedge that was hacked by the blade of Billy Bones out of the wooden sign of the ‘Admiral Benbow.’ ”
 
Treasure Island was intended as a book for boys, and has an immediate appeal as an exciting adventure story; but like Robinson Crusoe and Alice in Wonderland, it has been enjoyed by adults as much as by children. The subtle observation of character, the vivid imagery of the language, and the disturbing undercurrents running beneath the surface of the story have fascinated readers and provoked endless study of the text. The story was adapted for the stage, and every year in London and elsewhere well-known actors and less well known parrots are auditioned for productions. There have been at least five films based on the story. In 1920 a silent version featured a woman (Shirley Mason) playing the part of Jim Hawkins. The 1934 version had Jackie Cooper cast as Jim and Wallace Beery as Long John Silver. In 1950 the Walt Disney corporation sponsored a lavish production with Bobby Driscoll as Jim and Robert Newton giving a definitive performance as Long John Silver. Orson Welles played the same part in the 1971 version, and in 1990 Charlton Heston played Silver and his son played a somewhat older than usual Jim Hawkins.
 
Thanks to Stevenson’s illuminating letters and essays, we know a great deal about the various sources which inspired him during the writing of the book, as well as the models for some of the principal characters. The catalyst was the treasure map, but he also drew on his memories of the works of Daniel Defoe, Edgar Allan Poe, and Washington Irving. He took the Dead Man’s Chest from At Last by Charles Kingsley, and admitted his debt to “the great Captain Johnson’s History of the Notorious Pirates.” Interestingly, he was scathing about Captain Marryat’s The Pirate, which he thought was an arid and feeble production.
 
The dominating personality in Treasure Island is, of course, Long John Silver. He is better known than any of the real pirates of history and, together with Captain Hook, has come to represent many people’s image of a pirate. He is tall and powerful and has a wily character which alternates between jovial good humor and utter ruthlessness in the pursuit of gold. His left leg was cut off after he had been hit by a broadside when serving as quartermaster of Captain Flint’s ship off Malabar. He does not have a wooden leg but carries a crutch, “which he managed with great dexterity, hopping around on it like a bird.” In Captain Johnson’s General History of the Pirates there is a memorable description of “a fellow with a terrible pair of whiskers, and a wooden leg, being stuck around with pistols, like the man in the Almanack with darts, comes swearing and vapouring upon the quarter-deck.” It is possible that Stevenson had this figure in the back of his mind when he came up with Long John Silver, but he always said that his sea cook was based on his friend W. E. Henley, a writer and poet who made a considerable impression on everyone who met him. Lloyd Osbourne described him as “a great, glowing, massive-shouldered fellow with a big red beard and a crutch; jovial, astoundingly clever, and with a laugh that rolled out like music. Never was there such another as William Ernest Henley; he had an unimaginable fire and vitality; he swept one off one’s feet.”
 
Henley was the son of a Gloucester bookseller and contracted tubercular arthritis as a boy, which crippled him and led to his having one foot amputated. He traveled to Edinburgh to see the eminent Professor Lister about his condition, and while in the Scottish capital he was introduced to Stevenson. Henley had little talent as a writer, but he became a forceful and independent editor of several magazines and anthologies. In a letter to Henley from Switzerland shortly after completing Treasure Island, Stevenson wrote, “I will now make a confession. It was the sight of your maimed strength and masterfulness that begot John Silver in Treasure Island. Of course he is not in any other quality or feature the least like you; but the idea of the maimed man, ruling and dreaded by the sound, was entirely taken from you.”9 Stevenson later expanded on this and explained that his aim had been to take an admired friend and to deprive him of his finer qualities, leaving him with nothing but his strength and his geniality, and to try and express these traits in the person of a rough seaman.
 

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
686 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Desert Lamb
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Pirate Book and Easy to Enjoy
Reviewed in the United States on August 26, 2017
Under The Black Flag is an easy to read book with smooth transitions between chapters. Each chapter is dedicated to a specific pirate topic that is explained in an easy to understand way, without boring the reader with unnecessary details. Mr. Cordingly does a wonderful job... See more
Under The Black Flag is an easy to read book with smooth transitions between chapters. Each chapter is dedicated to a specific pirate topic that is explained in an easy to understand way, without boring the reader with unnecessary details. Mr. Cordingly does a wonderful job at transporting the reader back to the gold age of piracy. The author explains the life of these characters by exploring with historic events all the way from how a person decided to become a pirate to how piracy was brought to an end. This book covers famous pirates such Kidd and Blackbeard, but only enough to provide a general understanding of these characters and this is great for a reader like me - who is new to the topic. I was pleasantly surprised to learn certain details about pirates that I thought had been made up by Hollywood, but now I feel I can enjoy pirate movies and shows better. Under the Black Flag answered a lot of questions I had about pirates and their lifestyle and now I am more fascinated by them than before reading the book. I strongly recommend this book if you have any interest whatsoever in the topic.
22 people found this helpful
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Heather
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Well-Researched and Enjoyable Read
Reviewed in the United States on September 10, 2018
I enjoyed this book a great deal, not only for its well-researched historical content, but for the way the author illuminates how the realities of the Golden Age of Piracy inspired and differed from popular fiction and film. The author covers a great deal of ground here,... See more
I enjoyed this book a great deal, not only for its well-researched historical content, but for the way the author illuminates how the realities of the Golden Age of Piracy inspired and differed from popular fiction and film. The author covers a great deal of ground here, relating the real-life stories of some of the most famous historical pirates, like Captain Kidd, Blackbeard, Bartholomew Roberts, Calico Jack, Anne Bonny, Mary Read and more. There was a chapter devoted to female pirates, which I quite appreciated. There''s a lot of information here, presented in a pleasant, easy to read style. The downside to that is the fact that some information seems a bit jumbled together, in a flow-of-consciousness manner. But this is a forgivable offense, given the sheer quantity (and quality) of information. Moreover, I found it a highly enjoyable and satisfying read. I recommend the book to anyone looking to learn more about the Golden Age of Piracy.
9 people found this helpful
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Charlotte Goddard
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
No Romance; just torture!
Reviewed in the United States on December 7, 2020
I only read 1/2 of the book. There was enough description of the tortures used--that was all I could stand. I looked at the titles of future chapters--one wholly on torture. Was interesting to see some of the names of pirates and where they mauraded. But enough was enough.
3 people found this helpful
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R. S. Goins
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Info, but a Difficult Read
Reviewed in the United States on August 8, 2018
This was my first book on the topic of a pirates, but compared to others I''ve read since, it''s a difficult read. The author is clearly qualified to write such a book from an academic standpoint, but I question the formatting of the book and the overall writing... See more
This was my first book on the topic of a pirates, but compared to others I''ve read since, it''s a difficult read.

The author is clearly qualified to write such a book from an academic standpoint, but I question the formatting of the book and the overall writing style. By jumping around in the timeline of history and fiction, it felt a little frantic. I often times felt the need to go back to earlier parts of the book for context. What I found most helpful about it is that the content piqued by interest in more specific topics that I could concentrate on in subsequent reading.

All said, the information is solid, but may not keep every reader engaged.
6 people found this helpful
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Rusty
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book, but....
Reviewed in the United States on August 9, 2016
I was hoping this would be more factual (I got it to help with research with a period piece I''m writing). The first chapter is more about the media written pirate and contrasting it to the reality. But it fails to give much of any real information. I''m about halfway done... See more
I was hoping this would be more factual (I got it to help with research with a period piece I''m writing). The first chapter is more about the media written pirate and contrasting it to the reality. But it fails to give much of any real information. I''m about halfway done and the chapters carry more as you go on. If you''re looking for a wide view history then this book is good. If you''re looking for just facts you should make this one your second choice. His writing though is fast paced and intriguing. Definitely a good read no matter what.
14 people found this helpful
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David Burr
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Educational But With One or Two Issues
Reviewed in the United States on August 3, 2016
While Cordingly is clearly an excellent writer, there are a couple of things with which I struggled here. The primary one is at least a bit objective, while I am admittedly subjective in the second. First- If you read this book you get the distinct impression that each... See more
While Cordingly is clearly an excellent writer, there are a couple of things with which I struggled here. The primary one is at least a bit objective, while I am admittedly subjective in the second. First- If you read this book you get the distinct impression that each chapter was written independently, without consideration that they would be compiled into a book. The amount of redundancy tells us all we need to know about that. If the work was planned as a whole, the same facts would not surface 6-8 times.

Secondly, you really have to be infected with a form of pirate-mania to want to hear endless details about every "important?" pirate book, play, or movie ever made. For me, that was just over the top. Who cares about detailed plot lines, who the actors were, and endless minutia? To be fair, the descriptions of the book, as well as the reference to "The Romance" in the title, indicates that we have not been duped - this subject would be part of the text. Personally I had no use for it. But of course since each chapter is essentially its own self-contained college term paper, not having been built on a previous one in any great sense, you can just skip ahead. Or at least go to a place where it stops talking about the media-created "pirates".

These not-so-small nits aside, you really do learn, via the authors research of public records, what pirates were all about. The book is an easy read. It would be great to get into modern-day piracy, but that would be another book because there is no way to dovetail that with this work that describes what might be called the hey-day of piracy.

.
27 people found this helpful
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Alex P. Berg
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not great, but could be better
Reviewed in the United States on March 26, 2015
There''s tons of quality information to be had here, and you can tell the author does his best to bring the information he''s gleaned from judicial summaries, shipping report, and testimonials to life. However, the tale he weaves is incredibly meandering, so that most... See more
There''s tons of quality information to be had here, and you can tell the author does his best to bring the information he''s gleaned from judicial summaries, shipping report, and testimonials to life. However, the tale he weaves is incredibly meandering, so that most chapters don''t seem to have any real cohesive subject, and the chapters bounce back and forth so that the book as a whole doesn''t move forward in any sort of logical or chronological manner. And unfortunately, whether due to the author''s style or the limited research materials, the final product comes across as rather dry, and for lack of a better word, boring. Recommended for the pirate enthusiast, but don''t expect to be riveted to your chair during the read.
6 people found this helpful
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liverleef
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An in depth look at real pirates
Reviewed in the United States on July 31, 2006
This book really surprised me. There are many fascinating facts about pirates that I never would have imagined. First the physical appearance of pirates that we have learned from the movies and TV is not altogether inaccurate. Pirates actually did dress very simalar to the... See more
This book really surprised me. There are many fascinating facts about pirates that I never would have imagined. First the physical appearance of pirates that we have learned from the movies and TV is not altogether inaccurate. Pirates actually did dress very simalar to the pirates of cinema. They indeed often kept parrots as they made good pets on ships and could be used to bribe officials. Yes many of them had wooden legs too. It seems that when a limb became damaged and required amputation there were usually no doctors available, however there were carpenters. Every ship had a carpenter to care for the ship and they usually were responsible for removing infected limbs and sometimes creating prosthetics.

Not all pirates cruised around in massive warships either (although some like blackbeard did). Very often they used small sloops since they were fast and easy to maintain compared to huge lumbering ships. Something else I had not expected was how infrequently pirates engaged other ships in battle. Usually when a merchant ship encountered a pirate ship they would immediately surrender. There are several surprising reasons for this. One is that merchant ships usually had a crew of around 10 or so. During battle it would take 4 to 6 men to operate one cannon as well as a couple of men to man the ship. A pirate ship on the other hand may have a hundred or so men. They could easily operate numerous weapons and all the pirates were armed to the teeth with guns and cutlasses. Most merchant ships simply didnt have even a remote chance of defeating a pirate ship. Very often if a merchant ship did try to fend off the pirates or escape the pirates, the pirates would be enraged. When they finally caught the merchants they would make examples of them and subject them to all sorts of cruelties. As their reputation for this behavior spread, merchants became even less inclined to engage pirates in battle.

The pirates also seemed to try to frighten them by using fierce looking flags. Not all pirates used the skull and crossbones. An image of a bloody skeleton holding an hourglass also instilled fear into merchants. It was a not so sublte way of saying, you have a short time to surrender or die. Perhaps one of the greatest weapons was fear.

There are too many other interesting pirate facts to mention. Buy this book!
7 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Jo
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Same book different title
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 9, 2019
Be aware this book is exactly the same content as ''Life among the Pirates'' published in 1995 by LB and co. As I was unaware and excited to read another book by David Cordingly I was disappointed to discover I basically already had this in my collection. Hence the 3 stars. A...See more
Be aware this book is exactly the same content as ''Life among the Pirates'' published in 1995 by LB and co. As I was unaware and excited to read another book by David Cordingly I was disappointed to discover I basically already had this in my collection. Hence the 3 stars. A shame and possibly my own fault for not realising this fact. However I would strongly recommend this book to anyone who doesn''t already own the other version and who has an interest, either small or ravenous, regarding the history and legends of the brethren of the coast or pirates as a subject matter. It''s an excellent read and source of reference.
11 people found this helpful
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Rick Woolls
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Under the Black Flag
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 17, 2018
The David Cordingly book '' Life Among the Pirates'' with a different title.
6 people found this helpful
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JOHN
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Compelling reading
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 13, 2021
For some reason I developed a passing interest in pirates, probably after reading books for my grandsons, so did a little research and bought this. it is a little dry and lacking in humour, hence just 4 stars, but I did find it compelling reading.
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July Japer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fascinating read.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 28, 2015
I took this book on holiday with me recently and couldn''t put it down. If you haven''t read any books on the history of pirates before this is a great place to start. It''s highly readable and covers the "Golden age of piracy" when rogues like Blackbeard and...See more
I took this book on holiday with me recently and couldn''t put it down. If you haven''t read any books on the history of pirates before this is a great place to start. It''s highly readable and covers the "Golden age of piracy" when rogues like Blackbeard and Bartholomew Roberts terrorised the Atlantic. It dispels a lot of the myths surrounding the pirates, though the truth is more fascinating than the fiction. A great read.
7 people found this helpful
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JoRo1970
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A gift
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 4, 2018
Bought this as a gift for my Dad who loves all aspects of history but is just getting into the history of pirates. The reviews were good so I thought he might like it. Will update review once he''s read it.
2 people found this helpful
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